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Storm clouds over the Bradshaw Mountains

The high for the day was supposed to be below 90 degrees…and there was a 50-60% chance of rain in the area starting around 11:00.  The image is from two minutes shy of noon and I had yet to feel a drop of rain…and I wouldn’t for the next hour that it took me to make it back to the truck…but it was beautiful in its potential.  Sometimes that has to be good enough….

Storm clouds over the Bradshaw Mountains

nearing sunset

approaching the end of a long day on the road, i saw clouds over the mountains and foothills and cinder-cones north of flagstaff, it appeared as though it might rain and i even thought i smelled it on the air as i came nearer to the mountain town, looking south and west at what was north and west of the settlement, i didn’t notice a wind, but maybe that is water falling aslant from the darker sky, above a fence-line dividing the earth in someone’s imagination

cinder-cones north of Flagstaff nearing sunset

Beyond Bumble Bee

For the past several years, I have used the website “Weather Underground” to follow the temperatures and weather patterns in the places I have lived…and to even look back nostalgically at places where I used to live to see how things are going there, as well.  Two weeks ago I was watching the temps for Black Canyon City and hoping the high temperatures for the coming weekend would be lower than they were a couple of weeks earlier when I was out in the murderous heat and so desperately needed a Coke after my hike.  I was in luck…the high for this past Sunday was supposed to be under 100 degrees, which meant that I could get out on the trail around 6:00 or 6:30 in the morning, have a nice long hike, and still make it back to the truck before the heat became too ugly.

This first image is of the Bradshaw Mountains, looking northwest at 6:25 am.  The larger trees in the foreground are a variety of Palo Verde.  During drought conditions, the trees lose their leaves and are still able to perform photosynthesis through the chlorophyll in the “bark” or exterior covering of all of the branches and trunk….  You can also see several Saguaro cacti in the background….

Bradshaw Mountains Morning

Most of my hiking in recent months has been along the Black Canyon Trail.  I’ve been out six times and have covered nearly half of the 78 mile long trail.  If you care to look at a map, find Interstate 17 (I-17) going north from the Carefree Highway at the extreme north end of Phoenix, and imagine a trail running in the desert just west of the interstate and east of the mountains further west…and follow that space northward for about 80 winding and curving miles up toward the Prescott National Forest.  The portion of trail featured in this post is what can be found heading north from Bumble Bee Road, about 25 miles north of Phoenix.

This second image is primarily of the “Pancake Prickly Pear” cacti and the dried wild grasses common to this area.

Worn "Pancake Prickly Pear" cactus

If you’ve ever driven that same interstate north from Phoenix and remember seeing a rest-stop sign for “Sunset Point,” and you stopped to look west at the huge, folding and flowing mountains, this hike took place on the stretch of trail just west from that Point.  The first part of the hike was mainly in the shade, as the trail followed the contours of the west facing side of the hills and was situated far enough below the ridge-line that I was out of the sun for quite a while.

Colors of the earth, slope of trail

It’s been a while since I shared multiple photos as single images, instead of presenting them in the “gallery” form, but I thought the photographs from this hike would be easier to appreciate in this larger form…so here they are, placed in chronological order and covering the first two and a half hours of the hike.  There will be a couple of other posts in which I share groups of photos from particular stopping-places along the trail.

Bradshaw Mountains Northwest perspective

These “desert hills” and mountains are quite different than the ones I hiked for the last few years, but they are still inviting…and tempting me to go off-trail to explore the draws and ridges that we can see off in the distance.  I won’t likely do that until the temperatures are much lower, however, just in case some “unplanned” event occurs and I’m out there for longer than I had planned to be.

Bradshaw Mountains with folds and layers

In the below photo, you can see an unpaved portion of Bumble Bee Road in the lower right corner, a couple of hiking trails further in the distance, and then a section of what might be the Agua Fria River bed in the area just left of center.

Bradshaw Mountains with tracks and trails and river-beds

I had knelt to take some closer shots of Prickly Pear cactus fruit and saw this single piece of bone lying nearby.  A quick search of the area failed to reveal any other bones, so this one must have been carried away and left here when the predator or scavenger was finished with it.

Black Canyon Trail "ossi-findings"

At just past 7:30 am, the sun was sufficiently over the ridge to highlight the shrubs and grasses along the trail in the next photo.  This one, right here, is where peace comes out on the desert’s trail, to me anyway…I love this image, this piece and the broader whole that it represents…the light, the smell, the quiet whisper of the morning breeze among the branches and grass, the un-nameable feeling that comes with being right here…is wonderful, and compelling, and alluring, and causes me to go out into the unpleasant heat that I know is quickly approaching, so that I can be here on a trail like this one.

Welcoming trail in the morning

I would prefer temperatures in the 60s or 70s, but it was far from ugly-hot when I stopped to make this next photo.  At only 7:45 am, it was still rather nice for desert hiking.

Black Canyon Trail and Bradshaw Mountains

My only companions for the day were two mountain-bike riders who passed me on their way out and back in again…and the occasional cow, a couple of dozen lizards, multitudes of desert birds, and a single rabbit…

Line of demarcation

Lines of demarcation, thine and mine, in the images above and below, but I was and am thankful that there was a gate or opening that allowed passage…so many places we’d like to go, it seems, have fences around them….  At 8:10 in the morning, I wondered how many mornings and afternoons these fence and gate posts have seen….their colors and textures speak of years…decades, even.

Character of Place, gates of passage along Black Canyon Trail

The photograph below shows another view of an image that you have likely already seen…but I wanted to share it again within the context of the hike, moving from place to place, with the morning green of the desert hills and mountains, and the richer green, like a ribbon of life that thrives along a desert waterway, a sometimey waterway that likely runs below ground for most of the year, but rises again with the various seasons’ rains and floods.

Riparian Greenbelt of Sheep Gulch

I usually become aware of the Gambel’s Quail when they burst from the underbrush as I pass too close to their hiding place, but I happened to spot this silent sentry as she sat alone in the tree some 20 or 30 yards off-trail.  Even at this distance you can tell that this one is a female, as her head is missing the distinct color pattern that is common to the male.

Wildlife of Black Canyon Trail

And lastly, several blooms on a Graham’s Pincushion cactus.  I found several of these along the trail and, upon first seeing them, thought they were headbands that some hiker had lost along the way…they were so very bright, so vibrant in the middle of all the earth-tone, desert colors that surrounded me, they just seemed so unnatural and out of place.  And if you’re interested, the flat, paddle-like leaves around this cactus belong to the Jojoba plant….

Graham's Pincushion Cactus blossoms

So…that was most of the hike, on the way out, anyway…and minus a couple of detours that I will share later.  Thank you for visiting…and I hope you have a nice week.

 

Making friends in Arizona………again….

Today’s installment comes to you from the Black Canyon Trail, about five miles south of Bumble Bee Road, where I have finally had occasion to meet more than just a few dozen lizards, rabbits, and birds….

I was minding my own business, hiking down the trail, when I heard an instant of “noise,” and then the tell-tale rattling coming from somewhere nearby.  I immediately stopped in my tracks, looked all around me, saw nothing of concern, walked a few more steps down the trail and the rattling became fainter, turned around and walked back the way I had come and it became louder, passed a few more steps beyond the precise spot where this guy was hiding and it became faint again, and then walked back, peered into the brush, and saw him/her sitting pretty, just waiting for me to make a photograph.

The truth of the matter, when it comes to how the photo came to be, is that I was looking through the middle of the brush while holding the camera down at ground level and pointing blindly through the underbrush, hoping that something good would come out of it.  For only a moment, I considered lying prone in the trail to have a better view of the subject, but then thought better of it, and remained squatting there, pointing the camera and hoping for the best.  This is photo number five, and the only one that turned-out well.  I was surprised and thrilled when I got home, downloaded the photos, and beheld this little treasure….  And no, I was not this frighteningly close to the creature…the “zoom” function on my point-and-shoot camera is wonderful!

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake from Black Canyon Trail

 

If you’d like to revisit the earlier post, “Making friends in Arizona,” where my Little One and I encountered our very first rattlesnake in the “wilds” of Arizona, you can click on the highlighted name to do so….

Sheep Gulch greenery

Yes…it really is a desert, but this is what it looks like when a “river runs through it.”

Just off the Black Canyon Trail about five miles north of Bumble Bee Road, west of Interstate 17, found in the canyon down from Sunset Point.

Just off the Black Canyon Trail about five miles north of Bumble Bee Road, west of Interstate 17, found in the desert plain, down from Sunset Point.

Sycamore Canyon Wildflowers

Coming after the last post where I revisited a sun-drenched mountainside of Wasatch wildflowers, it’s only fitting that I come back to reality and the desert of my current home and share some images that are more recent and represent the local beauty as I have found it in Sycamore Canyon….

Desolation Trail Memories

I can’t assume that it’s a body memory, as my body only made this particular venture once, exactly two years ago this weekend, although I had been on various parts of the trail several times over the years, but this occasion, this hike, has been floating around in my mind for the past few weeks and I decided to take a look at the photos again.  I won’t present an entire gallery or series of images as I did after taking the hike, but I will share a couple of photographs that I find to be particularly appealing and representative of the beauty of the region.

Desolation Trail Wildflowers 2013

The above image is but a fragment of what must have been acres and acres of wildflowers that were covering the south and western facing slope of Mount Raymond.  When I was sitting in the saddle of the mountains in the below image, the deeper cup shaped spot to the left of the highest points (the Twin Peaks), one week later, I could still visualize the yellow blanket of wonderfulness that I was standing beside as I made these two photos…even though I was probably six or more miles away.

Broads Fork Twin Peaks over Desolation Trail wildflowers

Thank you for visiting and sharing some sweet memories with me….

City Paint Phoenix 13 – Muscle Man of Roosevelt Community Church

Appearing on the east-facing wall of the Roosevelt Community Church at 924 N. 1st Street, in Phoenix, this familiar sight finally became subject for one of my stops during a photographic excursion that included the abstract net-art that I featured in this earlier post, Her Secret is Patience.  This was a rather fruitful venture, as it provided fodder for at least another five City Paint Phoenix features that will appear here in the next several weeks.

I won’t claim to have any understanding, knowledge, or insight into the meaning of the mural or its significance on the side of a church building whose congregation purports to be open-minded and accepting of all peoples, etc., etc., but I will suggest that maybe it has something to do with the connectedness of the members of the human species, as displayed by the red-meat that we all possess beneath our variously hued external coverings of skin…rising from the dust of the earth…and then, maybe…our spirit/energy/soul/etc. transcending our terrestrial trappings and going out into the ether to join the rest of the cosmos…etc., etc., and so on…I don’t know.  I already said that…I just don’t know.  But here it is anyway, an intriguing mural along Roosevelt Row, another contribution to the local street-art scene.

Muscle man mural of Roosevelt Community Church

The only artist attribution I could find for the mural was a single article in a local newspaper that provided three names – Bishop Ortega, Larry Valencia, and Anthony Vasquez.

As always, I hope you’ve enjoyed this latest addition to the City Paint Phoenix street art series…and I thank you for visiting.  I think it would be fun to hear/read what you think of the mural and what it might mean.  I know there are several friends here who have extensive experience in the art world…so please feel free to share your thoughts….

Summer Solstice Morning Trail in the Sonora Desert

It’s a little more than a week-old at this point, but it’s one of the only “nice” shots from the entire five hours out there, so I thought I’d share it.  This is photo #6, taken at 7:05 a.m., on the Black Canyon Trail, heading north from Black Canyon City, Arizona, USA.  It was hotter than blue blazes toward the end of the hike and there was nothing so inviting as the thought of getting into the truck and making a quick stop at a corner store for an ice-cold Coke.  I’m not in the habit of doing that after a hike, but it sure was wonderful on this particular afternoon!

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