Snow Cones

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32 responses

  1. Stunning!

    March 26, 2012 at 6:56 am

  2. What an appropriate title for some fantastic photographs. I love that last pine cone. The detail is marvelous. Those are different than the many of varieties of pine cones we find in Virginia. Interesting. πŸ™‚

    March 26, 2012 at 7:13 am

    • Thank you, Marcy…it is a rather different cone, isn’t it? We have several varieties of pine and fir trees here, as well…kind of difficult to pick them all out when looking at my tree/plant guide…and the cones are interesting…..

      March 26, 2012 at 6:43 pm

      • Those little arrow shaped tentacles (?) are unique to anything I’ve seen around here. We too, have several varieties of pines and cedar trees. The detail of the cones is superb when set on that snowy background. Mother Nature never ceases to come up with something new and different. Amazing.

        March 26, 2012 at 7:46 pm

        • I’m thinking it is a Douglas Fir cone, as my Pocket Naturalist Utah Trees and Wildflowers Guide says that the “distinctive cones have 3-pointed bracts protruding between the scales.” Seems to fit…. And yes, I thought the snow was an excellent background…helps highlight the detail. Amazing Mother Nature. πŸ™‚

          March 26, 2012 at 7:50 pm

          • We have Douglas Fir’s around here. Maybe I need to find one, and examine the cone a little closer ??? Hmmm, now I won’t sleep tonight, and it will be your fault. What do you have to say about that? LOL πŸ˜‰

            March 26, 2012 at 7:56 pm

          • Hmmm…I guess I would suggest that the trees aren’t going anywhere…so you can probably sleep tonight and worry about it tomorrow. πŸ™‚

            March 26, 2012 at 8:11 pm

  3. They ARE snowcones! Excellent.

    March 26, 2012 at 7:36 am

    • Yes, they are, Lois…thank you. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 6:44 pm

  4. Love the contrast of neutral shades

    March 26, 2012 at 8:15 am

    • Thank you, Bonnie. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 6:45 pm

  5. I love these shots!

    March 26, 2012 at 12:22 pm

    • Thank you, Erica. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 6:45 pm

  6. Cute play on words! Just beware the yellow ones… πŸ˜‰

    March 26, 2012 at 12:31 pm

    • The title seemed fitting…and yes, will watch-out for the yellow ones. Thank you, Gunta. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 6:46 pm

      • πŸ˜‰

        February 20, 2015 at 8:46 pm

  7. I love these shots! The first one looks as though the cone is propelling it’s way through the snow (with its “blades”).

    March 26, 2012 at 6:54 pm

    • My thoughts exactly, Lemony…I almost captioned it with something about submarines or airplanes. Thank you. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 6:56 pm

  8. elmediat

    Very well done ! πŸ™‚ Definitely don’t want to get those snow cones stuck on your tongue.

    March 26, 2012 at 8:22 pm

    • Thank you, Elmediat…and no, won’t be licking these snow-cones. πŸ™‚

      March 26, 2012 at 8:58 pm

  9. Those are great shots! Super idea and terrific execution!

    March 26, 2012 at 10:07 pm

    • Thank you, Montucky. πŸ™‚

      March 27, 2012 at 6:57 am

  10. Interesting cone. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one like it.

    March 27, 2012 at 8:08 am

    • The best I can tell is that it’s a Douglas Fir, Allen…hope I’m not wrong…or maybe I hope I am…and someone can learn me something! πŸ™‚

      March 27, 2012 at 9:40 pm

      • Looks like the correct I.D. to me. We don’t see too many Douglas fir here. They are used ornamentally occasionally and for cut Christmas trees.I’ve never seen one growing in the wild.

        March 28, 2012 at 5:48 am

        • I have seen them advertised for Christmas trees and for wreaths, but don’t really see the cones on them. They are here aplenty, in our canyons and mountains…usually deeper in, but very accessible. Thank you for confirming the ID. πŸ™‚

          March 28, 2012 at 6:34 am

  11. Very Clever!

    March 28, 2012 at 8:27 pm

    • Thank you, Zannyro…for the comment, and for visiting. πŸ™‚

      March 29, 2012 at 6:34 am

      • You’re welcome! πŸ™‚

        March 29, 2012 at 6:35 am

  12. George Weaver

    It is definitely a Douglas Fir cone. You made it into a a monster airplane propeller. I had absolutely no idea what that awful thing was when I first laid eyes on it. Beautiful photographs, however. I gotta’ give you that. These are true macros! I am impressed.
    πŸ™‚

    March 28, 2012 at 11:51 pm

    • Thank you for the confirmation ID, George…and I’m glad you like them. Thank you for the nice words. πŸ™‚

      March 29, 2012 at 6:36 am

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