Archive for January, 2014

interstate sunrise

Visiting with Adrian at Cornwall Photographic this morning and seeing his image from Porthnanven reminded me of a very different scene that was graced with a very similar sunrise.  I made this image along the interstate freeway somewhere in the middle of Utah in January, 2012.

Utah interstate sunrise


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Swan on La Caille pond in Winter

Swan on La Caille pond in winter


warmth….

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shadow play


Scofield Horse Barn

You might remember that my little one and I went fishing up near Scofield Reservoir this past summer.  You might also remember that all of the fish were safe when we left…but that we brought home some images of the Rocky Mountain Bee Plant, some other images of water-fowl, an image of the Scofield cemetery, and now some images of an abandoned barn.

You can click on those highlighted names if you’d like to visit the other posts, otherwise, you can click on any image below to be taken to a gallery presentation of these photos of the Scofield horse barn.


Skiers beyond Red Pine Lake

You might remember some earlier posts about Red Pine Lake…or Upper Red Pine Lake…but these images are from my first visit to the lakes when they were under snow.  If you’d like to view the images from those earlier posts, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and find the Categories widget toward the right…and then click on Red Pine Lake.  You’ll see photos from the Red Pine Lakes that I made in September and October of the past two years.

As I was gazing out over the lake, checking-out the mountains, and glorying in all that was around me, I noticed a couple of cross-country or back-country skiers heading across the lake.  While this isn’t something that I would enjoy doing, crossing the frozen lake, I admired that they were out there partaking in the winter wonder that we find living near the mountains of northern Utah.  This first image is the southern half of the lake.  The upper Red Pine lakes are situated up and to the left of this image.

Red Pine Lake, south side

The below image is the northern half of the lake.  There is a bit of a dam or retaining wall in the clear area to the immediate right of the large clump of trees…it is essentially in the middle of the image.  The lake is a natural depression in the terrain and catches water from the seasonal rains and snow melt.  There is also an inlet on the south end that catches the drainage from the upper lakes.  While I do not know any of the specifics of the dam’s construction, I would imagine that it was built in the early 1900s as a means of preserving and releasing quantities of water for use in the metropolitan area down the canyon…as that was the reason other mountain lakes in the area were dammed.

Red Pine Lake north side

The track that I took to the lake climbed the ridge to the east of the lake…the skiers took the lower approach, which is the one that I’ve taken on my earlier visits.  The snow was quite deep and I didn’t have my snow-shoes, so I was just following the track laid by other skiers and hikers…but I would occasionally break through the compressed snow and find myself beyond my knees in the cold white stuff.

Skiers on track across Red Pine Lake

I didn’t stay to watch the skiers until they were completely out of my line of sight, but I did catch them as they continued their climb up the side of the mountain for a bit….

Skiers going up slope from Red Pine Lake

Skiers further up slope from Red Pine Lake

Part of the wonder in being out there in the mountains like this, regardless of the season, is the realization of how absolutely tiny we are as individual humans in the great expanse of our world.  I know this is only a small representation of our relative size to the rest of the physical world, but I think it captures the notion very well.

Skiers in perspective above Red Pine Lake


“Imperfect Men”

“It has been said that trees are imperfect men, and seem to bemoan their imprisonment rooted in the ground. But they never seem so to me. I never saw a discontented tree.  They grip the ground as though they liked it, and though fast rooted they travel about as far as we do.  They go wandering forth in all directions with every wind, going and coming like ourselves, traveling with us around the sun two million miles a day, and through space heaven knows how fast and far!” – John Muir

Aspen in the sky


Oquirrh Mountain Moon-set

I had a late start for work the other morning, and as I walked out to the truck, this is the sight that greeted me….

Oquirrh Mountain Moon-set


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View from the back steps….

Snowy Twin Peaks  under Clouds


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Mountain Ash of Butler Fork

Mountain Ash and Aspen in Butler Fork


City Paint 17 – Gallenson’s Gun-shop Elk Mural

I found this mural “under construction” back in April or May of 2013 and have been driving past it a couple of times a month since, hoping to find the parking lot unoccupied and the building not drenched in overly bright sunlight.  Finally, last weekend, I happened to find the mural with both of those conditions met, so here it is.  I’m not sure who the artist is, but it is probably the same one who created the mural in City Paint 9 – Oriental Furniture, as the style seems to be a dead-match.  You might remember Gallenson’s Gun-shop from the Five on Five western mural that I featured in City Paint – 6 through 6.5. That mural is located to the far left of this one on the perpendicular wall at the south end of the rear parking lot.  Anyway, here it is…rather busy for the eyes, but it’s pretty awesome at the same time.

And remember, you can click on any image to be taken to a gallery where you can view each photo in greater detail…and if you’d like to see more posts on Salt Lake City’s street art, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Street Art – Graffiti under the categories widget.


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snowy crossing

bridge over Millcreek Canyon stream


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Winter Swan

Winter Swan


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lines on blue shadows….

Skiers crossing Red Pine Lake


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snow stream

snow stream


Farmland and mountains in Goshen, Utah

In this image from April, 2013, you can see the early spring greenery on the fields and hillsides, while there is still a fine covering of snow on the distant Wasatch Mountains.  Goshen is approximately 50 miles south of the Salt Lake Valley, in Utah County, and just a bit south of Utah Lake…the fresh-water lake that drains north via the Jordan River into The Great Salt Lake.

farmland and mountains, goshen utah


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snowy candelabra

snowy candelabra


intersection

My kind of traffic jam…Baker’s Pass, as viewed from the trail (bottom left) that leads to the summit of Mt Raymond.  This is one of the few trail junctions that I’ve found here in the Wasatch Mountains that provides so many choices for destinations.  This particular spot is approximately four miles from the nearest trail-head, so at minimum, it’s roughly midpoint for an eight-mile hike.  If you head toward the upper right, the trail leads to the top of Gobblers Knob…if you follow the one toward the upper left, the trail goes down into Bowman Fork…and if you go toward the bottom right, you could either go back down into Butler Fork…a little further and down into Mill B North…or past those two selections and head west around Mt Raymond itself and then down into Porter Fork…and there are still further options from there.

Trail intersection at Baker's Pass, Wasatch Mountains, Utah


Bridge over Red Pine Stream

I made this photo while on the way to Red Pine Lake near the end of December, 2013.  You can click here to see a strikingly different image of the same location that I made in September, 2012.  If you cross this bridge and follow the trail to its end, you will find yourself near the three alpine lakes of Maybird Gulch.  I have only made the trip once in my three years here in the Wasatch…a short foray into the area that found me hopping unsteadily from one treacherously snow-covered boulder to another around the lower lake.  It was rather nerve wracking and I haven’t been back…but I will get there again in the warmer months when the green mountains are more suited to exploration.

Snow-covered bridge over Red Pine Stream


Eleven Miles from Somewhere…again….

“Yesterday morning, on my drive home from the store where I had just purchased the week’s food and other household supplies, I was looking at the neighborhoods I passed and at the smoke and steam coming from roof-top chimneys and vent pipes.  I also caught sight, through and beyond the clouds, of parts and pieces of the white and enormous mountains that line our eastern horizon.  It was and is still amazing and weird and wonderful to find myself in this place in the middle hours of this last day of the year, in a place so new and strange and removed from where I was last year.  As I drove those snow-lined streets back to our neighborhood proper, I happened to notice a mile-marker sign that was posted along the road.  It said “Mile 11.”  Now, I am familiar with state highways and roads that leave their freeway confines and become or pass along the same route as a city street, like US Highway 60 in Arizona that becomes or passes-along on Grand Avenue, bisecting the Valley of the Sun to take travelers on their way to Wickenburg or beyond, and I know of US Highway 89 that takes us from Flagstaff to Page, and to Kanab and Panguitch, and then marks a parallel course to I-15 as it leads north to Provo and Salt Lake, eventually becoming State Street that runs the central length of our city, but I was not familiar with any such state route or US highway that had turned into 700 East as it made its course through the city.

Seeing the sign made me wonder about the eleven miles that had passed on the other side of that mile marker and how many other miles existed in the opposite and other direction, whatever and whichever way that actually was.  It struck me as odd, too, and maybe allegorical even, in the processing of what yesterday was and what today is in the marking of time in a year and this present time or era or segment of my life and my family’s lives in this time of crazy and dramatic change.  We’ve come to this station and place in our lives, taken such drastic steps to find ourselves in a new state and locale, and work and living and natural environment and our heads and hearts and sometimes emotions are spinning and wondering and looking for something familiar to grasp and hold-on to as we attempt to regain our balance and direction.  And here we are then, eleven miles from somewhere, remembering and thinking about the past and wondering about the future, holding-on to each other, leaning against one another in our little relocated family, awaiting the arrival of others and missing those who won’t or cannot join us…and our friends, of course, we remember and miss them too, those precious ones who, even from outside the circle of our family and intimates, loved us and brought us joy and companionship for the past twenty years and more.

So it’s not only us, but you, too, who on this first day of a new year are eleven miles from somewhere.  Where are you going, what are you doing, how are you, and we, too, going to measure this year when it’s gone, like we’ve done to the one that is just passed and passing?”

***This is a Favorite Re-post from January 1, 2011.