Black Canyon Trail

Desert light….

By far, I have found it best to be on these desert trails shortly after sunrise, or within the first hour thereafter….

…the light is more pleasant and provides for greater character in the subjects found along the way.

Two Sundays ago found me hiking south on the Black Canyon Trail from the Bumble Bee trailhead.  I have hiked this stretch of the trail once before…on a sweetly cloudy day in July of last year.

I didn’t go as far with this present hike, as the day’s heat was growing more oppressive and casting something of an ugly hue on everything that caught my eye.

I didn’t get out hiking in the earlier part of Spring, and have therefore missed the rich greenness that all of these wild grasses and flowers must have added to the area.

I love the pearl-like clusters of the creosote or grease-wood bushes…especially when the morning light is behind them.

The desert, overall, wasn’t especially attractive on this particular morning, but when I stopped along the trail to look more closely, I found plenty to admire.

All of these images are from the first two and a half hours heading out on the trail.

And in the photo below, a glance skyward brings a reminder of what can happen if one tarries too long…..

 

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Sonora Desert Morning

…the trail rounds rocky corners and hiding hills and rises gently from the desert floor as the sun eases from below the far horizon and lights anew this sharp and prickly land…the glow and flare inside the lens is equaled among the red spines and golden stems of cacti and brush and grass alike…the morning fire quietly waking the harshly coated earth…sweet light fading soon with the ascent of day….

Sonora Desert Morning


desert deja vu

I’ve only been hiking about two dozen times since I moved back to Arizona almost two years ago, and all of the hikes have been on different trails…or on different sections of the same larger trail…with very little overlap of covering those sections, and on only one occasion, hiking the exact same trail.  When I was hiking in Utah, I covered many of the trails several times, five or six times, and even more than ten times on another two trails…they were compelling locations with easy and quick access, short drives from the house, where minutes later I would find myself in the woods…alone, or with very little company.

You might remember from various earlier posts that I’ve hiked several segments of the Black Canyon Trail…and on some of those occasions, I went past the “formal” or designated section’s length and continued onward for another mile or two onto the next section….this is some of the “overlap” that I mentioned above.

Rolling desert hills of Arizona Sonora Desert

When I found myself about 100 yards to the left of the location on the trail where I made this photograph, I had an overwhelming sense, a physical knowing, that I had been there before.  It actually caused me to stop and turn in slow circles looking for something that was familiar…some landscape feature that was significant and placed somewhere in my memory.  I found nothing…there was nothing that I recognized…and I can usually recall sections of most trails that I’ve hiked, both here and in Utah…the stuff just gets cataloged away, mental images….  Anyway, I “felt” that I had been here before…and I’ve never “felt” that way before when out hiking.  Yes, certainly, I’ve visually recognized and absolutely “known” where I was out on hikes that I had made before…but this is the first time that I “felt” or physically “sensed” that I was somewhere where I had been previously…but didn’t visually recognize….so it was odd…strange…made me wonder about juju and voodoo and other related and unrelated things.

Maybe it was a physical memory as a trauma response to the last time that I was at this location…at the spot right there in this image.  I had hiked north to this point…and then went off trail to go exploring in what looked like the chute or body of a rock-lined water-course and water fall…the point that you can see immediately to the right of the large light-colored rock that is just left of center in the image.  I went off trail…something that I don’t do unless I leave a note saying that I’m going to do it…something that maybe I shouldn’t do, shouldn’t have done…something like that.  But…I did…bush-whacked it right through the desert and climbed over the associated boulders and scree, balanced on shifting rocks with my full back-pack…and then there was a buzzing and flying creature screaming into and around my face, darting at my eyes, nearly clinging to my glasses with wings flashing and whining face-close and loud…my hands swatting at the winged-beast, trying not to knock the glasses off my face…and finally, the bastard landed next to the outer corner of my right eye and JABBED its stinger into my face flesh and then its poison or toxin lightning-darted and ran and flew through the nerves and up into my scalp, Real Lightning Darts, not any of that fake shit you see on TV or read about in pulp magazines…but the real stuff, right through the muscles and upward…screaming WOW WOW WOW!!!!!

Hmm……..

So…after I steadied myself, assessed the minimal damage to my confidence that I was really somewhere that I should have been…realized that my eye wasn’t going to blow-up…realized that I could still see…with just a little bit of blur…I sat on a rock, had a bit of water, and then continued my explorations….cautiously…listening….watching.  There were no hissing and rattling snakes or attacking Gila Monsters…no circling round of buzzards aloft overhead…and no banjo-playing hill-billies…..just a dried desert waterway that hadn’t been visited by any creatures that would have left tracks since the last rainfall.  After looking around in the wash and making a few photographs, I climbed back up the hill to an area close to where I made this image, and then continued up the trail, still heading northward, the same direction I was going before stepping off the trail to go exploring and getting my face stung.

I think my spirit of adventure had been abated somewhat…and I didn’t actually continue very far up the trail.  I had already gone more than a mile past what I had planned, so I did a 180 and then started back to the truck.

In my post-event analysis of this experience of “feeling” that I had been there before without actually recognizing it, I think that this must have been where I turned around…where my body decided for me that it was time to go home…that my still hyper-alert mind had probably cataloged the whole surroundings and then recognized them before my conscious mind did when I returned to the place while hiking south from a different trail-head….some seven months later.

So…that’s the photograph…that’s the place…that’s my little bit of desert deja vu.

I hope it was fun for you, too.  🙂

 


Image

Arizona Sonora Desert Morning

Arizona Sonora Desert Morning


Antelope Creek segment of the Black Canyon Trail

I made this first image within the same minute that I made the photo from the last post…at 7:45 on a Sunday morning a few weeks ago…but this one caught the sun just coming up over the ridge.

Silhouettes, signpost, and sunrise along the BCT

There wasn’t anything spectacular about the landscape on this hike, as it resembled much of the Black Canyon Trail (BCT) that I had already hiked…but this was yet another section to complete, the Antelope Creek segment.  I had actually hiked the first mile of the trail on another occasion, but this was the first venture in covering the entire area.  This is the portion of the BCT that is just south of the Drinking Snake segment that I covered in an earlier post.

After several hours of hiking south and southeast and then north and northwest on the return trip, I was back at the same spot where I made the first image, approaching it from another direction and with the fullness of the day’s sun shining on the land.

Double-track trail with juniper and trail-sign along Antelope Creek segment of the Black Canyon Trail

Thank you for joining me on another hike in the Arizona Sonora Desert…and stay tuned for more coverage of the Black Canyon Trail.


just before…

The sun had already risen, but the trail had meandered down into a fold of the land and I found myself again in a pre-sunrise situation.  The foreground wasn’t actually this dark, but with the brightness of the sky above the horizon, the area closer to me was darkened and made for a nice silhouette image.  That’s one of the trail-signs to the left of the juniper tree…a common and reassuring symbol that I was exactly where I was supposed to have been at 7:45 on a Sunday morning….

Just before sunrise on the Black Canyon Trail, Antelope Creek segment


“Drinking Snake” segment of the Black Canyon Trail

I’ve shared several posts with images that I’ve made while hiking the Black Canyon Trail, here in the Arizona Sonora Desert, just north of Phoenix.  If you’d like more information on the trail system itself, you can click on the highlighted name to be taken to the home-page.  There are something like thirteen sections that cover approximately 78 miles of scenic desert trail leading from the Carefree Highway, just down the road from my house, all the way up to highway 69, just north of Mayer.

This post pertains to the area that I covered during my ninth hike on the Black Canyon Trail (BCT), the Drinking Snake segment, which, if you care to look at a map of roughly central Arizona, you will find six miles north and west of Interstate 17 and Bloody Basin Road (exit 259)…and for those further interested, or even mildly curious, I did not encounter either a drinking snake or a bloody basin….

The glow of sunrise before arriving at trailhead

I was still about three miles from the trailhead when I was compelled by the beautiful sky to stop and make some photographs.  The above image is from 7:28 am., about 12 minutes before the one below, taken from the trailhead parking lot.

The moment of sunrise in trail-head parking lot

I can’t think of a reason to share a photo of my truck here on the blog, so just forget that it’s there.  I always take a photo of the truck at the start and end of my hikes to mark the time…that’s all…and given where the sun is located in this particular image, I figured (when I made it) that the sun would wash-out the image, but it would still show the truck and mark the time.  When I returned home and found that it was actually a rather nice image of the sun just peeking over the horizon, I had to do more with it than just leave it in the folder.  Anyway….I was happy that my point-and-shoot captured an uncharacteristically clear and aesthetically pleasing image of the moment of sunrise at 7:40 am.

Cairn along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

As you will notice as you scroll further into the post, and possibly remember or reflect on the desert images from earlier postings, the landscape I encountered on this hike was markedly different from what I found on other outings.  The first example of that difference was in the juniper trees that appeared in clumps and in singular instances along the trail and out on the rolling hills and plains.  The cairn above appeared to be a tabletop for some creature that thrives on the juniper berries.  I found a handful of other locations along this first part of the trail that appeared to be similar feeding stations.

Close-up of juniper berries atop cairn

A reliable website that I frequent when researching various hikes, Arizona Hiking, indicates that the elevation of the Drinking Snake segment ranges between about 3,900 and 4,300 feet, which is a significant enough increase in elevation to effect the types and kinds of cactus and other desert/high-desert vegetation that can live there.

Morning shadows on hillside along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

The weather report for the area said that it was going to be a partly to mostly cloudy day…but it was a bit different during the time I was out on the trail.  There were beautiful clouds for sunrise and the next hour or two, but the earlier winds seemed to have removed them for mid-day and early afternoon.

Sun-glow of Prickly Pear cactus along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

I love to hike in the mornings…aside from there being many fewer people out hiking or riding their trail bikes, the rising sun plays wonderfully on the cactus spines and grasses that I normally find along the way.

Dried desert buckwheat flowers along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

The below photo is a bit darker than I would prefer, but it still gives you an idea of the grassland and the different type of shrubs…the singular yucca with its multi-podded antennae, the juniper off to the right, and, of course, the few groupings of the ubiquitous Prickly Pear cactus….and the fence….

Fenceline with scrub, cacti, and morning clouds along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

And here are another five photos that show the morning light captured in the cactus spines and seed-heads…

Glowing seedheads and Prickly Pear cacti along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…a different variety of the Prickly Pear cactus…and seed-heads…

Golden-spined Prickly Pear cactus with wild grasses along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…a nearly heart-shaped lobe of cactus…

Prickly Pear cactus along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…wild grasses and cactus spines…

Dried grasses and cacti along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…and some kind of wildflower left-overs among the cacti….

Dried wildflowers and Prickly Pear cactus along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

Looking toward the southwest, but mostly west, we can begin to see more of the Bradshaw Mountains…beyond the rising, grassy plain…

Rolling hills, mountains, and clouds along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…and looking behind us, the direction from which we came, we can see the flatter grassland and those fading clouds….

Grasslands and clouds along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

A few minutes later, the trail turned a bit toward the east, still going south, though, so the mountains out in the beyond are not the Bradshaws…but possibly the New River Mountains…I’m not sure.

Richly-desert foreground with mountains and clouds along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

The online resources indicate that this watering hole and windmill are at 2.8 miles into the hike…but they didn’t say anything about the clatter and racket from the blades, or the sound of the wind in the air and among the grasses….

Cloudy sky with windmill along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

Those are the Bradshaw Mountains off in the distance…and I believe this little draw area in the foreground might be the drainage of Antelope Creek….  The section of the trail just south of this Drinking Snake segment is named after Antelope Creek…and this bit of landscape is in the right spot to be such a named thing….

Bradshaw Mountain panorama viewed from Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

And this next image is looking east again, with a bit of south in it, as well…with a couple of horses and mountain silhouettes, cacti…and the ever grasses….

Distant horses on grassy plain along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…a bit closer….

Horses and hillsides along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

…and a bit farther away, too, from a slightly higher elevation and further down the trail where you can see a greater spread of the land.

Wide open spaces along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

We’ve already seen a different presentation of this next image…it’s the same bit of ground as the one where the horses first appeared…but we’re closer now.

View of sloping plain and mountains along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

The Drinking Snake segment of the Black Canyon Trail actually ends right there at that lone tree in the upper image.  Just beyond that spot is a graded road…Forest Road 259, or Antelope Creek Road….the northern starting place for that next section of the trail that I mentioned above.  I’m not sure how long that stretch of the trail is, but it will join up with the segment that we visited a while earlier when we went north from Bumble Bee Road…back in July.

I made this last image toward the very end, actually the very middle, of my hike…my turning-around point.  It’s about 0.8 miles into the next section of the trail that is south of the Drinking Snake segment.  I hadn’t explored this bit of ground on the map before heading out…and hadn’t indicated (on the note I left taped to the fridge at home) that I was going further, so it was a good spot to sit and have a snack before heading back to the truck.

Desert foliage and mountains along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

So…that was another almost six miles of the Black Canyon Trail…shown in chronological order from the starting sunrise to the point of return.  Thank you for joining me on the hike.  I hoped you enjoyed this latest glimpse of the Arizona Sonora Desert….


when there is water where the wind blows…

Just a few images from my most recent hike along the Black Canyon Trail…with more to follow in another post….

Windmill and open plain along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

This not-so-old watering hole was situated roughly three miles into the hike…the trail approached it from the right and continued toward the left…in the below photo.

Windmill and watering-hole along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

It was a rather breezy morning and the air was filled with the sound of the cockeyed spinning and clicking of the blades.

Windmill and clouds along Drinking Snake segment of Black Canyon Trail

When I passed-by again on the return trip a couple of hours later, it wasn’t moving at all…the glory of the morning light was gone, and with it, the continuous flow of winds that blew through the little funnel and curvature of land where the windmill was located.


Black Canyon Trail north from Emery Henderson Trail-head

Sunday morning, November first of this present year, eight minutes into the hike…the desert looked like…well, the desert as I have come to know it.  This stretch of the Sonora Desert has become rather familiar.  I’ve been on this trail eight times now and have covered more than 40 of its 70-plus miles…and this stretch is the furthest south that I have been.  There might be still one more track south of this trail-head, but being familiar with the area south of here, I doubt that I’ll head in that direction.

Black Canyon Trail heading north from Emery Henderson Trail-head

The early twists and turns of the trail, and the crossing and re-crossing of dry water-ways or creek-beds had brought me up a slight rise and pressed on toward a flatter plain that would soon give way to other and more declivities and inclines as I progressed northward.  I had seen this particular Saguaro from further back and wondered if the trail would take me anywhere near it.  If one were “looking for a sign” when lost out here in this desert wild, that someone might be tempted to view this as some kind of guide, or not….  I found it to be a significant landmark that, when coming from the other direction a few hours later, told me that I was very close to the end of my excursion.

Pointing Saguaro

I’ve seen mistletoe several times, but don’t know that I’ve ever posted any images of it.  Here it is in it’s context…

Desert mistletoe in Palo Verde tree

…and here it is again, but in a closer view.

Desert mistletoe close-up

The living and the dead of the eternal desert….

Ocotillo and Cholla cacti with desert tree skeleton and desert hills

An old-school trail marker, faded by severe summer suns….

Old-school trail marker

The trail was actually quite a bit lower than the surrounding desert in the below photo.  I thought it provided a nice shrub-height perspective.

Line of sight - eye level with Creosote and Saguaro cacti

I thought there would be more to this section of the trail than there actually was.  I came to the end much sooner than I thought I would and then stood there mid-trail thinking, “Is that all…really?”  It felt much too early to head back to the truck and I wasn’t inclined to marching further on the already familiar track, so I headed off-trail to explore a couple of the minor peaks in the area.  After reaching the top of one, I turned north and found a pleasant-enough view of the desert beyond…the trail toward the middle of the image is the one that would take me up toward the trail-head at Table Mesa Road.

Elevated perspective - desert hills panorama

I’m still adjusting to this desert hiking and have to admit that I’m sometimes disappointed in the landscapes and panoramas…sometimes they seem so featureless…or plain….  Someone once said that it’s not what we look at, but what we see that’s important…so I press myself to look more closely in my search for beauty out here…I try to look at things with a fascinated, scientific mind sometimes, framing things within contexts of what I’ve read and learned about this type of landscape.

Enchanted canyon - desert lichen

And when looking much closer, I find cliffs and canyons covered in lichen….not literal cliffs and canyons, of course, but ground-level rocks that are covered in the moisture-dependent and fragile, yet enduring yellow lichen that appears with more frequency than one would expect out here.

Ocotillo cactus and desert hills

I notice, too, the varieties of plant life and the slope and angles of the land as it rises and falls in its relationship with, among other things, the comings and goings of water, the sculpting that occurs from the drainage and collecting of its seasonal rains…and then I wonder at how it looked when it was born, this volcano-riddled desert…..

Misted desert ridges

From the top of another hill, I looked south and over the desert that pressed against roads and homes and saw the distant ridges that were clothed in the mists of commerce and civilization…smog…and was touched by the irony of this kind of “beauty” being the result of something so inherently unappealing.

Desert hillside grasses and Jojoba

When I was taking a biology class in college several years ago, one of our assignments was to conduct a field study or observation of the plants growing on one slope and compare them with the vegetation found living on an opposite hillside.  I had recollections of that experience when I was climbing the hill in the above image.  I had just been on a different slope that was only dirt and rock with very little of anything growing there and no evidence of animal-life, and then visited this particular slope that was covered with wild grasses and Jojoba shrubs, desert trees and cacti, and had wild burro and rabbit droppings, as well as lizards and chipmunk/squirrel type creatures scurrying about….what a difference there was to be seen in the opposite extremes of the lay of the land……when looking closer.

Desert density - view through a tree

I don’t know the name of the tree in the above image, but it provided an uncommon and inviting shade as I was descending the last hilltop of my afternoon explorations.

Classic Sonora Desert perspective

And lastly, an image that presents the contrast of near and far in the Arizona Sonora Desert…not very compelling when viewed from a distance, in my opinion, but strikingly beautiful and fascinating when experienced up close and personal.


“The Walking Dead” Saguaro…..

I’m not a great fan of popular culture, but this one was too fitting to deny….

Walking Dead Saguaro

I’ve never seen a Saguaro cactus in such a state of decay…upright…

Walking Dead Saguaro closer

…so it came to me that it must be a zombie Saguaro…escaped from the set of The Walking Dead TV series….just hanging-out in the Sonora Desert, just off the Black Canyon Trail……

Or not…..