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Ducks in Reflection….

It’s almost funny how the best images from the hiking trip were from before I even arrived at the trailhead….

Taking Lake Mary Road from the freeway takes one, not surprisingly, past the stretch of mountain meadow that has been turned into upper and lower lakes/reservoirs…and then to another forest road turn-off that leads one to the Lowell Observatory, or to Marshall Lake.  My destination was the Marshall Lake trailhead that would lead me down into the canyon and eventually to Fisher Point.  Six or seven hours later found me with less than 100 photos of the excursion…and substantial joy (?) at how well (to my thinking) the images turned out from the lower Lake Mary….

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City Paint Phoenix 20 – Hiding…maybe…?

I haven’t been near Roosevelt Row in some time…so it was a pleasant surprise to find some new (?) work.

This single mural is on the east-facing wall of 407 E Roosevelt Street in what is essentially downtown Phoenix…on what I understand to be an art gallery named “modified/arts.”  I don’t know the name of the mural or exactly what the artist is conveying…but I don’t want to, either…the possibilities and what they strike in my mind are enough….

The artist is Hugo Medina.  Please click on his name for more information about him and his work.

A Glimpse at Bells Canyon’s Upper Falls

After my daughter and I hiked to the lower falls, as featured in this post, we continued up the trail for about another hour and then arrived at the upper falls.  Amid the spray and the treacherous footing on the soaked boulders and ground, it was difficult to manage another angle that would have provided a better or more clear perspective or presentation of this natural water-feature.

We stood in literal awe for several minutes, shifted our positions to gain different perspectives, stayed there again for several more minutes, and then retreated a bit into the woods that we had just come through to approach the falls.

You can still see the falling water through the trees to the right and behind my daughter in the above photo, so you can probably imagine how loud it must have been to be so close.  There was a pervasive serenity, sitting there in the woods, even with the roaring of the falls as near as they were…with the crashing water on the granite boulders and then the rushing of the stream in front of us….

White patches up in the trees caught my eye….

What a refreshing spray after the steep hike to get there…melted snow…living water….

Just a little further downstream is a bridge that has been chained to the trees on both sides of the bank to prevent the rising and rushing stream from carrying it away.  There is a trail that you can take off into the shoulder-high brush that will lead you in a near circular manner out and up to the area just upstream from the top of the falls…and will also eventually lead you to the upper reservoir and beyond.

If you’d like to see an image of the falls later in the season, you can click here to see what they looked like in August of 2013.

Hiking the Peralta Trail – Last

It was five months ago yesterday that I took the hike and made these photos, so I should probably finish the series and post the images that have been sitting here in draft form since February…

Peralta Trail Superstition Mountain stacks and waves

You might remember from the previous posts that there was a chance of rain and that the skies were overcast for most of the hike….  You might remember, as well, that the significant landscape feature of the hike was Weaver’s Needle….

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and Pinion Pine perspective

I had hiked out to that lone pinion pine in the above photo and made some closer-up images of the Needle…and also in the above photo, if you can imagine us to the far right and out of frame, that is where I was when I made the first image of this post, looking south and east from that bit of a plateau that leads to the pine tree.  I was heading back to the Fremont Saddle to descend the trail on the hillside that would take me down and to the west of the Needle when I made the above photo.

Peralta Trail approaching Weaver's Needle from the southwest

On the level trail now, still looking at the southern aspect of the Needle…in among the rich desert foliage that was largely unfamiliar to me, but contained some type of willow, mesquite, and occasional palo-verde.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle water feature

It had rained earlier in the week and the park ranger said all the streams had stopped flowing.  The rushing course had stopped, but the water was still seeping slowly in the deeper parts of the canyon, still moving enough that I could hear the occasional trickling that seemed so out of place in my surroundings.

Peralta Trail delicate desert in the Superstition Mountains

The desert is not all dessication and waste….

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle from the north

If I had more time, I would have enjoyed climbing the hill, walking around the Needle, and capturing some images of what the prominence looked-like up close and personal.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and Peralta Canyon

Looking at Weaver’s Needle from the north…the Fremont Saddle is reached by going back through that rich path of green toward the right and climbing the switchback trail up to the lower portion of the horizon just below the patch of blue in the photo above.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and blue sky

Clearing skies on the way back…looking toward the north…

Peralta Trail - Peralta Canyon with Weaver's Needle panorama

And then the broader view, looking north again, from the beginning of the switchback trail leading up to the Fremont Saddle.

Peralta Trail Tolkien Towers and the Superstition Mountains

One of the last photos I made of the hike back, heading down the trail from the Saddle, through the “hordes” of other hikers making their way up to it; I stopped to capture an image of the rolling purple waves of the Superstition Mountains…and the Tolkienesque sandstone spires that adorned the ridge of the western aspect of Peralta Canyon.

If you’d like to take another look at the earlier two posts on the Peralta Trail, you can click here and here.

As always…thank you for visiting.  I hope you enjoyed the little glimpse into Arizona’s Superstition Mountains.

Bells Canyon Reservoir and Lower Falls

I have stood in this exact same spot, on a bench mind you, overlooking the Bells Canyon lower reservoir so many times that I cannot begin to number them from memory.

…and I have walked this trail in all seasons, heading toward the lower and upper falls, and even toward the upper reservoir another couple of miles up into the mountains.

If you look closely, in the above and below photographs, you can see a tiny splash of white that is brighter than the rocks below and to the left of it…that white splash is what I perceive to be the lower falls…something that I have observed from several miles down the road, and even as far away as the back balcony of my children’s home in West Jordan on the other side of the Salt Lake Valley.  Some might suggest that it is the upper falls, but there are no singular monstrous rocks beneath the upper ones, only the lower ones, where I and my hiking companion sons have rested and snacked after admiring the falls face to face.

Below is a favorite spot along the Bells Canyon stream…another special place that I have photographed multiple times…with snow on the banks and perched like cones or caps on top of the rocks with the water barely trickling among them, or with the rich greens of spring and summer when the water was crashing or running over the tiers of rocks like a flood.

It’s always such a pleasure to stand back and watch as someone beholds the falls for the first time…to see the delight in their eyes, and to watch the slight grin grow into a full-on smile as they are slowly christened with the over-spray and mist….

My daughter shared with me that someone had slipped into the falls a couple of weeks earlier while attempting to jump over the stream that led into them…and of the near futile efforts to locate and recover the body from under the logs where it was eventually found…a rescuer saw a flash of color in the crush of water that didn’t belong in the middle of it all…the red or yellow or blue jacket that was still on the the body….

In the last 100 yards or so climbing up to the falls, more than 30 hikers passed us on their way down the trail…and fortunately, there was only one other person up there when my daughter and I arrived…another quiet individual who we only glimpsed once or twice as we cherished the amazing wonderfulness that surrounded us.

The above photo is from near the spot above the falls where the individual likely attempted to jump across the stream.  I have sat there in the past with at least one of my sons…admiring the view and the crush of the melted snow that thundered over the falls…while having a snack of a crisp apple and “Indulgent” trail mix.

My daughter and I continued up the trail to the upper falls (to be shared in a later post)…but this is what it looked like, in the above photo, facing back up the canyon on our return trip down to the reservoir….

And lastly, an afternoon view of the Bells Canyon lower reservoir….  It used to take me 15 minutes to drive to the trailhead for the trail that leads to the reservoir…now it takes more than 10 hours….

Portal….

On the trail to Lake Blanche and the other Sister Lakes in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah.  An image to take one away…to another place and time…another existence or life, even…so it might seem.

Thistle…in isolation

The day had been long and filled with the concerns and wonders of traveling from the desert to that mountain place…stiff legs wanted to stretch…confined body wanted release…and the heart wanted to burst with joy at returning to a place that had been branded as “home” in its core.

Sundial Peak and Lake Blanche….

One could probably say that I’ve been guilty of overdoing things with my posts on Lake Blanche and Sundial Peak, so I’ll keep this one to a bare minimum and only post one photo from my most recent trip…although it’s been more than three years since I have been able to make the hike up there, so I should probably lay it on thick and post something like 20 or more photos….  Anyway, here’s the postcard image with the little people included so you can appreciate the grandness of the place….

If you’re relatively new to the blog, you can start here in viewing other posts on the lake and it’s surrounding area…or you can scroll down a little bit past this post, find the “Search” widgit, and enter “Lake Blanche” or “Sundial Peak” into that feature to be presented with a veritable list of options for seeing more of the place.

Wild thing….

The “Plan” for yesterday was to locate myself up in the mountains along a four-plus mile trail that led to one of my favorite Wasatch Mountain lakes, but the weather forecast suggested a 60-80% chance of snow and rain up there…and I did not bring any wet-weather-appropriate hiking gear with me from the desert…so I instead went and had lunch with an old friend…and then stopped off at the Jordan River Walkway on my way back to the house.  I know that I have shared images and commentary from/about the Jordan River when I was living here in the Salt Lake Valley, so some of you might be familiar with it already in a general sense.  If not, you can click on the highlighted and hyperlinked words above to visit the Jordan River Commission’s official website for more information.

While I did manage to make more than a few images of a couple of storks, a flotilla of juvenile ducks, bridge crossings, and river-scapes with mountain backgrounds, I also happened upon the above scene.  I had spied a small path in the wild grasses that appeared to lead from the walkway down to the river’s edge and was preparing to follow it so I might gain a closer vantage point/perspective…until I noticed this feral cat that had stopped in the middle of it.  The little creature was not startled or alarmed at my presence and didn’t move for what was probably only a minute or two…long enough for me to capture four or five images.  Anyway, there it is…nearly enveloped in a beautiful canopy of Russian Olive trees and other vegetation along the Jordan River.