Posts tagged “Arizona hiking

Badger Springs Trail

I’m quite certain that I’ve said it in the past, but I have another opportunity to confess, or admit, anyway, that I have become something of a reluctant admirer of Arizona’s desert beauty…the landscapes, rather, in which one might find beauty, might encounter the aesthetic appeal that touches whatever it is inside that gets “touched” and one knows or senses that one is in the presence or beholding something that one esteems in such places as beautiful, awesome, wonderful, inspiring, or even simply nice.

Water on the trail already and probably not more than a couple hundred yards from the trail-head.

My personal point or range of reference in such cases has been the landscapes of my childhood in Germany (with visits to France and Switzerland), South Carolina, and Florida, the high desert and mountains of the Front Range in Colorado in my younger adulthood, and more recently, the mountain and valley landscapes, as well as the winding river bottoms and grassy plains of Utah, in what I am hoping is still my middle adulthood.

At the crossroads, looking west. Two small figures at their campsite. I chose to go the other direction.

While it might not be fair, proper, or even emotionally healthy to make comparisons between places, preferring to live in one over the other, for instance, one cannot help notice differences between and among them, some of which one simply happens to enjoy more or less than others.  One friend suggested that there is no need to like one over the other, or even prefer to live in one over the other; he said that I should simply enjoy them for what I find in their offerings, for their individual appeal to that internalized aesthetic that makes my heart say, “Oh….”

Heading east now, preparing to meet the morning’s sun.

I haven’t been hiking for several months now…not since last August, actually; there have been reasons, not excuses.  That said, I went hiking the other day, and found reasons, again, to reluctantly admire the Arizona desert that lies something like 60 miles north and east of my home in the extreme northwest corner of the Phoenix metropolitan area.

A quick look back in the direction I didn’t go, with a nice view of a brimming pool of desert water.

I have read trip narratives and other on-line literature about Badger Springs Trail many times over the past few years.  I knew it wasn’t a very long hike and knew that it wasn’t too terribly far away, either, so it made for a good starting place to get back into the desert hiking thing.

And now into the sun…looking up the stream-bed with its bouldered bottom.

The trail is situated in the Agua Fria National Monument, something like a preserve, but sketched throughout with dirt roads that allow for vehicle travel to access its deeper parts.

Another pool in the sun’s glare. I was surprised at how much water was actually there.

If you remember the post I did a couple of years ago on “Indian Mesa,” that area is also contained within the Monument…several miles distant, but still there.  Some of the trip reports have indicated that there was no water present and definitely no badgers present; other narratives have said that there was plenty of water, depending on the time of year, but still no badgers.  My hopes, when leaving the city, driving up the freeway and out into the Monument, were only that I would be away from people, computers, and the noise of society.  While I did momentarily encounter two very distant people on my way out, and only two handfuls of them on the return trip, I did not come across any computers…or any noise of society.

Other people from other places…likely a Raccoon hand-print.

I did happen to see some ant-sized jet-liners making their way across the sky as I looked toward the various ridge-tops at a few points during the hike, but other than those few glimpses of people and airplanes, my hopes were realized and my soul was quieted upon the return drive to the city…something that I don’t remember feeling for quite some time…the peace that comes from having been immersed in an undemanding Nature that is simply there…even for a few toiling hours.

I left the trail earlier than I could have, but made the best of the boulder-strewn stream-bed.

When I had studied the landscape features of the Badger Springs area on Google’s map the night before the morning of the hike, I figured that I would follow the trail toward the right at the juncture, that I would head west and then south along and through the dried river bed.  It appeared that one would have that option (and one really does, of course, it’s the wide-open desert, after-all).  When I actually arrived at that juncture, the trail quietly suggested that I head the other direction, east and then eventually north.

Back on the trail proper for a bit with the morning’s low sun shining through last season’s dried grasses.

At the realized crossroads, I viewed the two people off in the distance at what I perceived to be their camping grounds, off to the right and west, a situation that I didn’t want to disturb or otherwise intrude upon…so I turned east and off into the morning’s sunrise.  I followed the well-maintained trail until it reached the boulders of the stream-bed.  At this point, I remembered that one of the narratives’ authors said it was best to cross to the other side and then continue on from there, evidently the boulder-hopping was going to get extreme, which it did.

Not fully leaved, the trees are still in their early springtime, but they have plenty of water to help fill in the new leaves.

There were many small and large pools of shallow water throughout the course of the stream; most would have soaked one’s feet and legs up to at least mid-calf…and very few others would go beyond that.  The boulders were ancient granite that had fallen from the surrounding cliffs of millennia past, washed smooth by the floods and the fine sands they carried, polished and bleached unto a near white, some of them, in stark contrast to the brown of the watching hills; and chunks of lava, too, rich in their darkness, like porous, black bowling-ball sized oblique orbs tumbled from some distant cauldron.

The images don’t follow the narrative, exactly, but they are presented chronologically from the beginning and take us all the way to the turning-around point.

When I think about the name of this place, Badger Springs, I have to wonder at how long ago that last badger was seen, have to wonder at how common the creatures used to be at such a place, if they ever were, and I do not wonder at how important this place of water must have been, and remains, to the animals who lived and continue to live in the area.  My mind goes also to the meaning of wild and how much of that remains in this place, how much of it remains outside of my wondering at what it must have been like, exactly there, before the Europeans came to see and stay, at how it must have looked when there were only the Native peoples who lived in the area and what their lives must have been like.  My one disappointment with the hike is that I was not able to locate the petroglyphs that adorn scattered rocks in the area.  When I read about the trail in the on-line literature, I thought it said they were at the end of the trail, near the top.

A very minor case of Badger Springs “reflectioning.”

Part of my wandering led me to be ever looking at what the end might be, what it could have been, what the top might be, as I was walking through a riparian wilderness that had existed for what must have been centuries upon centuries and longer, a remaining waterway that flowed through a rich canyon of scattered boulders, grassy meadows, and collections of cottonwood, sycamore, willow, and other deciduous trees and shrubs, and even juniper and thorny mesquite trees with assorted prickly pear and cholla cacti.  The stream went on and on, there was no solitary source, no “spring” that I could find, just the seeping and flowing water that percolated down through the hills and up from the ground and then collected in the waterway’s bottom, as water will do; it flows with gravity and then through the earth when there is enough to collect, its drops and tiny rivulets gather, as they do, and start to move, below the surface of the land and then above it when it can, going where there is least resistance, through and around, living in and on the land and nourishing what it passes, bringing and sustaining life in an otherwise wasted land.

A more serious case of Badger Springs “reflectioning.” Don’t forget to look down when hiking.

The only actual animal that I saw during the hike, aside from a smattering of birds and a solitary unnamed lizard, was a black bull, an Angus, maybe, a calm mass of flesh and hair that was grazing alongside the water in grasses that reached near to his belly, a creature that left huge tracks in the mud, the corporeal sign of the one other heartbeat that was with mine out there that morning.

It took about two hours to get to the turn-around point, so much of the hike was in the shadows of the cliffs and hills on the south side of the stream. I had completed the four-hour hike and was back to my truck by 11:00 am.

Yes, I had seen tracks of other peoples’ passing, too, footprints large and small made by shoed humans coming and going, some moderately fresh, and some that were made several days ago; but other Peoples’ marks, too, tiny bird tracks, and dogs or coyotes, even, those familiar footprints from my lifetime made in their own coming and going, to and from the water, mostly without human people’s prints accompanying them, and then there were the pointed hoof marks of javelinas in a different location…and finally, a raccoon hand-print in the still wet mud near a pool, left when fishing, maybe, or simply just washing. What else has gone away with the badger…what cats, deer, or antelope did I not see, could not have been seen any longer…what other parts of the wilderness and its wild lives have passed and gone?

I’m not decided on what is the main object of the image…but wish the flowers had a little more light to bring out their detail

The proper trail was lost and gone at around the one-mile mark, give or take, so the rest of the trip was all in the actual bed of the stream, sometimes hopping boulder to boulder, but most often walking on the dry earth down through the waterway or on either bank.  I must have crossed the bed half a dozen times when the growth became too thick to be reasonably passed-through, and sometimes I passed through the growth anyway, and have the bloodied scratches on arms and legs to prove it.

Another scene that is so incongruous with my idea of the desert.

I was watching for snakes and pack rats, Gila Monsters, and road-runners, and saw none of them; I was looking, too, for those petroglyphs, mentioned earlier, and couldn’t imagine where they might begin to be; at what possible place among the hundreds could I begin and have any chance of finding the proper one.

Another “reflectioning” image right before the 90 degree bend.

The stream bed hit a ninety-degree bend at about the mile and a half point; the terrain changed on both sides of the waterway and became more like rolling desert hills.  They were populated with various bushes, including jojoba, creosote, and California bottle brush, as well as the different cacti mentioned earlier.  The now-western hillside contained a bit of a lava or basalt parapet, but there were no “boulders” around it that I remembered from the photos I had seen on-line.  I had hoped to have something distinctive to draw my eye on one of the hill or cliff tops indicating that they had previously been occupied areas, but nothing struck me as likely places, so I continued on, pushing through the scrub, wondering when it would be far enough.

In another part of my hiking life, I would have thought that black spot near the center of the photo was a moose….

At what I believe to be the two and a quarter mile mark of the hike, I stopped for a water and snack break in the middle of a stand of ancient cottonwood and sycamore trees.  It has been sufficiently warm at night for the trees to waken from their winter slumbers, so they were all bedecked with fresh green leaves, full of the bright verdure that meant they hadn’t been baked and hardened by the summer’s sun.  The ground in this resting spot was covered in sand that reminded me of an ocean’s beach, evidence of the mass and force of the typical monsoon floods that must frequent such a place.  Rocks had been tumbled there, as well, and it has clearly been a while since any such floods had occurred, as there was plenty of typical tree litter that must have accumulated through the fall and winter seasons: branches and twigs, leaves of so many kinds, the fallen husks from the new leaf buds, as well as some kind of nut bodies from some unknown tree.

Poor guy had those seed pods stuck on his face. I had a bad enough time with them getting stuck in my socks and boot laces.

It was when I was here, in this cottonwood garden, that it was so quiet as to make me feel that my ears must have been plugged, somehow; the quiet was total, with not even a whispering of a breeze causing a tinkling among the cottonwoods’ leaves…a complete quiet…one rich in its fullness.

Just north and looking back at the stand of cottonwoods and other trees where I took a break and enjoyed the richness of quite.

That’s probably enough.  I hope you’ve enjoyed this little jaunt along the Beaver Springs Trail of the Agua Fria National Monument in Yavapai County, Arizona.  Thank you for your company.

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peace in pieces


Ducks in Reflection….

It’s almost funny how the best images from the hiking trip were from before I even arrived at the trailhead….

Taking Lake Mary Road from the freeway takes one, not surprisingly, past the stretch of mountain meadow that has been turned into upper and lower lakes/reservoirs…and then to another forest road turn-off that leads one to the Lowell Observatory, or to Marshall Lake.  My destination was the Marshall Lake trailhead that would lead me down into the canyon and eventually to Fisher Point.  Six or seven hours later found me with less than 100 photos of the excursion…and substantial joy (?) at how well (to my thinking) the images turned out from the lower Lake Mary….


Hiking the Peralta Trail – Last

It was five months ago yesterday that I took the hike and made these photos, so I should probably finish the series and post the images that have been sitting here in draft form since February…

Peralta Trail Superstition Mountain stacks and waves

You might remember from the previous posts that there was a chance of rain and that the skies were overcast for most of the hike….  You might remember, as well, that the significant landscape feature of the hike was Weaver’s Needle….

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and Pinion Pine perspective

I had hiked out to that lone pinion pine in the above photo and made some closer-up images of the Needle…and also in the above photo, if you can imagine us to the far right and out of frame, that is where I was when I made the first image of this post, looking south and east from that bit of a plateau that leads to the pine tree.  I was heading back to the Fremont Saddle to descend the trail on the hillside that would take me down and to the west of the Needle when I made the above photo.

Peralta Trail approaching Weaver's Needle from the southwest

On the level trail now, still looking at the southern aspect of the Needle…in among the rich desert foliage that was largely unfamiliar to me, but contained some type of willow, mesquite, and occasional palo-verde.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle water feature

It had rained earlier in the week and the park ranger said all the streams had stopped flowing.  The rushing course had stopped, but the water was still seeping slowly in the deeper parts of the canyon, still moving enough that I could hear the occasional trickling that seemed so out of place in my surroundings.

Peralta Trail delicate desert in the Superstition Mountains

The desert is not all dessication and waste….

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle from the north

If I had more time, I would have enjoyed climbing the hill, walking around the Needle, and capturing some images of what the prominence looked-like up close and personal.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and Peralta Canyon

Looking at Weaver’s Needle from the north…the Fremont Saddle is reached by going back through that rich path of green toward the right and climbing the switchback trail up to the lower portion of the horizon just below the patch of blue in the photo above.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and blue sky

Clearing skies on the way back…looking toward the north…

Peralta Trail - Peralta Canyon with Weaver's Needle panorama

And then the broader view, looking north again, from the beginning of the switchback trail leading up to the Fremont Saddle.

Peralta Trail Tolkien Towers and the Superstition Mountains

One of the last photos I made of the hike back, heading down the trail from the Saddle, through the “hordes” of other hikers making their way up to it; I stopped to capture an image of the rolling purple waves of the Superstition Mountains…and the Tolkienesque sandstone spires that adorned the ridge of the western aspect of Peralta Canyon.

If you’d like to take another look at the earlier two posts on the Peralta Trail, you can click here and here.

As always…thank you for visiting.  I hope you enjoyed the little glimpse into Arizona’s Superstition Mountains.


Desert light….

By far, I have found it best to be on these desert trails shortly after sunrise, or within the first hour thereafter….

…the light is more pleasant and provides for greater character in the subjects found along the way.

Two Sundays ago found me hiking south on the Black Canyon Trail from the Bumble Bee trailhead.  I have hiked this stretch of the trail once before…on a sweetly cloudy day in July of last year.

I didn’t go as far with this present hike, as the day’s heat was growing more oppressive and casting something of an ugly hue on everything that caught my eye.

I didn’t get out hiking in the earlier part of Spring, and have therefore missed the rich greenness that all of these wild grasses and flowers must have added to the area.

I love the pearl-like clusters of the creosote or grease-wood bushes…especially when the morning light is behind them.

The desert, overall, wasn’t especially attractive on this particular morning, but when I stopped along the trail to look more closely, I found plenty to admire.

All of these images are from the first two and a half hours heading out on the trail.

And in the photo below, a glance skyward brings a reminder of what can happen if one tarries too long…..

 


Hiking the Peralta Trail – Middle

This second installment begins where the first one ended, right at the Fremont Saddle…the geographic/landscape feature that appeared to be a resting and turning-around point for many hikers.  That was my impression, anyway, as there were a few people who walked out to the lone Pinon Pine in the distance, and many fewer people who actually went down the trail that eventually led to the base of Weaver’s Needle in the background…and swarms and tons of them at the saddle and back down on the first half of the trail as I made my return trek.

Peralta Trail first glimpse of Weaver's Needle

This second image is the view to the left of Weaver’s needle, made from the same location as the one above….

Peralta Trail looking west of Weaver's Needle from Fremont Saddle

There is actually quite a gulf of rock-filled space between that lone pine and the southern edge of the base of Weaver’s Needle, even though some of the following images offer a view that appears somewhat contrary to what I just stated.

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle and Pinion Pine from Fremont Saddle

If you can return to the first image above, find the two people, and then travel in your mind in a sort of quarter or third of a circle off to your right, you will come to the location where I made the below image…it’s looking somewhat off to the southeast…over a further expanse of rocky and bouldered desert that contains dozens of other trails.

Peralta Trail Superstition Mountains with yucca stalks

Crazy waves of mountain tops and yucca stalks….

Peralta Trail with waves of mountains and yucca stalks

Approaching Weaver’s Needle now, coming from the southeast where the above image was made…with a somewhat serpentine trail drawing us closer.  You can see two people on the trail….

Peralta Trail approaching Weaver's Needle on Fremont Saddle

And below, facing somewhat northeast over the rocks and mountains of the Superstitions.  I shared this image in a black and white rendering a few weeks ago….

Peralta Trail neighboring rocks of Weaver's Needle

It appears that we’re getting really close now….

Peralta Trail approaching the monolith of Weaver's Needle

Don’t forget to look down…and pay attention to what’s there….

Peralta Trail yucca viewed from above

Final yards up to the lone Pinon Pine…a feature that is discussed on-line as another favorite destination and turn-around spot.  I encountered a man and woman (and their dog) who appeared to have spent the night under the pine…and were packing to leave as the other hikers and I arrived…rested, lingered, and then departed to continue our respective journeys.

Peralta Trail Pinion Pine Pointe

This is the view from the ledge just down and to the left/west of the pine tree…there is quite a bit of space between the tree and the Needle…..

Peralta Trail Weaver's Needle from Pinion Pine overlook

More to follow….


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Weaver’s Needle and Surround in Black and White

Weaver's Needle and Surround in Black and White


Hiking the Peralta Trail – First

The Peralta Trail is just one of the almost 40 trails that one can find in the Superstition Mountains of Arizona.  The mountains are part of the Superstition Wilderness that lies within the confines of the Tonto National Forest. I might have mentioned it in the earlier post, but my visit to this bit of desert a week or so ago was my first….  I have only driven “close” to the area a few times in my two-decades-plus of living in Arizona…and by “close,” I mean maybe within 20 miles…or more.  The photo below was made about 17 minutes before “sunrise” proper, so it’s a little dark…even with some “fill light.”

Starting on the Peralta Trail just before sunrise

I didn’t really know what to expect when I arrived at the canyon.  I did know, however, that I would be following the trail, out and back, so I didn’t research the actual trail, other than to learn where to find the trailhead.  I did not check-out Google’s images of the trail or the mountains.  I wanted everything to be fresh…wanted the neuronal memories to be of things that I actually saw….

Peralta Trail water feature

I spoke with one of the National Forest attendants who was milling around the parking lot and he said that all of the streams had stopped running by then, said they were going earlier in the week with the rains, but that I shouldn’t have any difficulties crossing the stream-beds during the hike.  This one was still actually “running” when I encountered it on the way out, and back several hours later…but it was much nicer when this photo was taken, as I was the only witness of that particular moment of the day….

Peralta Trail green desert morning

Above and below, two images of the same mountain from different perspectives, different times and elevations…further along the trail with the second.  I suppose I could mention here that all of the photos are presented in time order…for this and the following two posts…all the way out and back.

Peralta Trail saguaro cactus and mountains

It was all quite new to me, as I mentioned earlier…a richness of green in the middle of the desert…green at the present because of the Winter rains and cooler temperatures…a seasonal reprieve from what I understand to be hideous temperatures that ride there in the middle of the year months.  The rock battlements in the lower photo were an accompaniment for the greater portion of the first part of the trail…they subsided somewhat…changed, rather, as the trail went further up the canyon.

Peralta Trail red rock battlements

Looking back-trail again in the below photo…amazed again/still at the greenery…

Peralta Trail saguaro and shadow mountains

And then comes the company…at least it was a dog…with a human trailing behind…two of them, actually, but quite ones…a girl-pair with their purple hair…and lip piercings…and water bottles and backpacks…on the trail of a Sunday morning…

Peralta Trail company approaches

*****

Peralta Trail rocks and mountains

I guess the one above is a closer view of the one below…climbing higher again.

Peralta Trail gaining elevation

…and this one, too….

Peralta Trail still higher

….anyway, it was damn beautiful out there and my sense of amazement only grew as the trail climbed in elevation….

Peralta Trail purple mountains' majesty

Pretty and crazy rocks….


A little bit of Superstition….

It was almost 85 miles from my drive-way in the far northwest valley to the trailhead in the extreme southeast valley, just across the county line, just beyond Apache Junction, just past Gold Canyon…and well worth the drive.

Superstition morning - walking the Peralta Trail

Seven hours on and off the trail, almost 300 photos later…an overcast day with the sun barely peeking out from behind the clouds for an hour, and then retreating back behind them….

Weaver's Needle - viewed from the Lone Pine on Fremont Saddle

While I was hiking in near solitude on the way out…it was like fighting an infestation of lice or mites on the second half of the return trip…walking people, talking people, loud people, colorful people, children people, slow people, dogs with people…and people people….

Superstition Mountains - looking southeast from east side of Fremont Saddle

But before the people…the views…the cool morning air…the rocks and greening desert…and the slight murmuring and chuckling of a diminishing canyon stream….

Heading back to the beginning on the Peralta Trail

This was my first trip into the Superstitions…and I will be back.

Superstition Mountains - a different kind of desert

More to follow….


Climbing Picacho Peak….

I’ve driven past this landmark on the way to and from Tucson innumerable times over the last two and a half decades…finally climbed to the top….kinda cool.

Tried to get there at sunrise to see the grand walls adorned with the fresh morning’s light….

Picacho Peak from Toltec Road Overpass

Parked outside the gate to Picacho Peak State Park…in the below image.  For anyone who enjoys the Wikipedia take on things, here’s another link…which addresses the redundancy of the name.  “Picacho” means “peak” in Spanish….so this is Peak Peak State Park….

Picacho Peak sunrise from the state park's entrance gate

The trail is going to take us up to the uppermost point on the prominence to the left…the eastern summit.

Hunter trail-head, start of the journey

Hunter Trail goes in a zig-zag switchback manner up the front of the slope in the above image, reaches the saddle at the notch on the right, and then drops down over 200 feet and then skirts along the south side heading east, and finally climbs up and up and up…..

Approaching the saddle of Picacho Peak, looking southeast from the north side

The above photo shows the view looking north and south from the front of the slope in the image just above it….and the photo below shows the saddle…looking east.  And yes, that is the “peak”….the destination…at the far left side of the image.

Picacho east summit and saddle viewed from west end of the saddle

Hmmm….lovely defacing of the placard…the peak is believed to be about 22 million years old….

Placard at saddle of Picacho Peak

Looking north and west from the saddle in the below image….a crumpled-blanket-looking-desert….

Looking southwest from the saddle on Picacho Peak

And now heading down from the saddle (below) with the double steel cable hand-rails…going waaaaay down the steep slope.

Double cable handrails heading down from the saddle on Picacho Peak

Looking directly south from the above slope…out over the irrigated desert’s fields….

Looking south at desert fields and desert hills

In the below image, we have made it safely down that severe slope and have headed east along the south side of the mount…climbed up a bit, and have arrived at something like an arena or amphitheater in the rock’s backside….

South side arena of Picacho Peak

Saguaro cacti, Palo Verde trees/shrubs, and Creosote/Grease-wood bushes….  The below photo is what is inside of the shadows in the right side of the above photo…

Inside the shadows of arena on south side of Picacho Peak

A singular cross on Golgotha….?

Western wall of arena on south side of Picacho Peak

Another incredibly steep climb upward with the double cable hand-rails….nearing the top….

Double cable handrails approaching summit plane of Picacho Peak

My only company on the summit….

Picacho Peak summit wildlife

In the below image, we’re looking north and west from the top….fascinating green veins where the water runs in its season…

Looking northwest from Picacho Peak summit

And looking north and east from the summit, in the below image, over the irrigated fields…over the freeway heading toward Tucson to the right…and over Rooster Cogburn’s Ostrich Ranch…in that white hangar-like structure…toward left of center…

Looking northeast from Picacho Peak summit

Looking west from the east and highest summit…over the western summit….

Looking due west from Picacho Peak summit

And now looking further west from that western summit….

Picacho Peak lower range viewed from western summit

In the below image, the eastern summit proper…the Picacho Peak….viewed from the slope of the western summit.

Picacho Peak summit proper

Looking up at the “trail” we just descended…heading down on the Sunset Vista Trail…which loops back around the Picacho Peak massif, heading west….

Looking back up at double cable handrails on Sunset Vista trail coming down from summit

The southern side of the mount just west of Picacho Peak massif, from the Sunset Vista Trail….

Desert mountain range west of Picacho Peak massif

And the western end of the massif…looking east….with Picacho Peak proper being around and behind….to the far right.

Picacho Peak massif viewed from the west on Sunset Vista trail

So, now we’ve seen Picacho Peak up close and personal…which will change how we “see” it from this day forward.

I hope you enjoyed the hike…thank you for coming along with me….