Posts tagged “Arizona photography

ludere luminis

Serendipity…

…I stopped for something else…

…enjoyed that something else…

…reluctantly left…

…back on the road…

…toward the original destination…

…the Earth moved in its way…

…’round the Sun…

…on its axis…

…and the horizon lowered…

…to bring us “Sunrise”….

* A companion post to “a morning’s grace” from August 2019.

Sycamore Creek

My former co-worker and friend, Chris, was traveling back from northeast AZ and had to stop to take some photos…the visuals were too good to not capture…somewhere along the Beeline Highway on a Spring afternoon…last year….


White Tank Mountains – Brittlebush

Encelia farinosa

Arizona Sonora Desert Museum fact-sheet

Sunday

March 1, 2020

8:14 – 8:55 a.m.

White Tank Mountains, Surprise, Arizona, United States

Arizona State Trust Land

Hiking

“Alone”

Not Lonely

Never Alone


vintage desert

One from the archives…November, 2018…looking east along the Walking Jim Trail…Lake Pleasant in the distance…and the rolling desert hills in between here and there.


two sides of the sky

One minute apart looking in opposite directions….

7:34 am, above; 7:35 am, below

Morning in the desert on State Trust land, just north of the White Tank Mountains in northwest Surprise, Arizona, USA.


New River Exploration

It’s been over a month already since I went looking for something new, a local place that contained a bit of wildness, a place that I hoped contained something like wildness, anyway.

I cross a bridge on my way to work every morning that spans a desert river that was a mere stream when I encountered it on January 5th of this year.

At this particular location, the river runs between the Glendale Municipal Airport to the west and the Arizona Cardinals’ stadium to the east….

…so it’s not exactly far away from anything civilized…and one might even suggest that it’s still smack-dab in the middle of it all.

I “had” to hop the fence that you might have noticed in the very first photo above.  I wanted to walk and explore along the actual river, so I had to get away from the cemented and fenced bike and walking path.  It was only upon my return to the walkway that I noticed the No Trespassing sign with its warning of prosecution, fines, and jail time.  Good grief.

Anyway, I found a free-flowing river, of sorts, one that happened to still be alive and moving in the desert.  I’m not sure how much of it will still be around come summer, but it was pleasant enough during my few hours out there.

One might consider that the riparian vegetation and bird life was enough to make this something approaching “wild.”

When we look closely we can see microcosms of life beneath the desert trees; we can see the tiny flora that can’t help but enrich the soil of the waterway.

There was an unexpected diversity of riparian trees, bushes, grasses, and other assorted growing stuff along the way.

You may already know of my admiration for dew drops on morning desert grasses….

It was almost easy to forget that I was close to an airport and football stadium when I didn’t look around or hear an aircraft overhead.

There was a feeling of being “away,” as long as I focused on what I could see and not so much on what I could hear.

I’m not sure of the particular variety, but there were many cottonwood trees along the waterway.

And even a fairly grand assortment of bird-life, as well (more to be highlighted in a following post).

Even a richness in the winter-colored ground-cover….

I don’t know what they’re called, but I think they’re fascinating little Japanese lantern type things that I found in only one spot along the river.

After going south and exploring close to a mile along the waterway, I encountered a significantly boggy stretch of ground that would have prevented me from keeping my boots dry if I continued heading in that direction.

So I went back north and past the roadway that I drive every morning, under the overpass, and into another stretch of the riparian wilderness that was more densely packed with trees and reeds and tall wild grasses and other thriving things.  I had to skirt quite a bit of the more slowly moving water and take a broader view of the area.

I finally made it close enough to the water and found the above setting; it was almost like being under a forest canopy.

A final image of the New River plant life.


a tree in context

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Palo Verde tree with low clouds over White Tank Mountains, 11/29/2019.


Indian Mesa from afar

I was hoping for a second visit to the mesa when I launched out on the venture in May of this year, but there was absolutely no way I was going to make it from this approach.  My first visit was in November of 2014 and you can see the images by clicking here.  The locations presented in images 4-8 of that earlier post are all under water in this photograph.

We had an unusual amount of rain through the past Winter and Spring, which allowed Lake Pleasant to become fuller than it normally has been…or maybe it could have been as full in the past, but the water management people allowed more of it to flow past the dam…or there’s some better explanation of which I’m not aware.

At any rate, I didn’t make it to the mesa, but I did spend a nice hour or so out in the desert wilderness watching egrets, herons, cormorants, Canada geese, and other water fowl, hunting, fishing, and sailing about in the water on an overcast Arizona morning.


Echo Cliffs, Highway 89, south of Page, Arizona

Going north for the week…can’t help but admire this part of Arizona in passing.  Check out this YouTube spot on the Echo Cliffs….


luminous

“The resistance to Copernicus, a kind of geocentrism, remains with us: We still talk about the Sun rising and the Sun setting. It is 2,200 years since Aristarchus, and our language still pretends that the earth does not turn.“ – Carl Sagan