Posts tagged “desert panorama

Walkin’ Jim Trail and beyond….

The morning started with the alarm and coffee and then a neighborhood street that led to Bell Road, to the Sonoran Desert Parkway, to Lake Pleasant Parkway, to the Carefree Highway and west past Lake Pleasant, then to Castle Hot Springs Road, and finally, five miles north to a trail-head in a parking lot that has been re-fenced with silver wire that is new against the morning, untarnished and unvarnished with desert sun and windblown sand, unrusted in the elements, bright and confining, restricting of early hikers looking for familiar portals that ride now in memory alone.

Common and uncommon things mix in a November sunrise.

Somewhere between light enough and yet not enough…we see destinations unfolding with the trail…like the white caps on the tips of the many saguaros’ arms with their densely packed and unfolding new spines…things to come.

One of many crossings of Cottonwood Creek…a familiar place with wild burros, great horned owls, and collared peccaries….

and lying on the desert floor, looking east…and finding that “distant fairyland of wonder and bright alarm.”

A creosote frame leaving an aromatic resin on fingertips….

…and the tiny treasures of desert wildflowers….

Still heading west…with the destination in the upper right corner…after many winding turns, hills, valleys, dips, and desert meadows….

A distant spot of white in a green and brown world….

Zoom….

Gaining elevation and looking east…we can see a bit of Lake Pleasant tucked into the haze covered hills…

…and south…faint waves of them…green, purple, blue…white…and gone….

Higher now, more of the lake…and the landmark of Castle Hot Springs Road.  You might remember that the haze is from California’s wild fires back in October/November.

The stark contrast of yellow against the greens and browns of the desert is a welcome change…it is even a surprise sometimes.

Walkin’ Jim Trail follows Cottonwood Creek up into the mountains, all the way from Castle Hot Springs Road…when the occasional mis-adventurer loses the trail on the way down the mountain, all he has to do is locate the proper drainage down from that mountain and follow it back into the stream-bed…and back to the parking lot where he started….

There were tadpoles larger than jellybeans in the pools along the way…more desert mysteries…marvels…Sonoran Desert surprises….

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Black Canyon Trail north from Emery Henderson Trail-head

Sunday morning, November first of this present year, eight minutes into the hike…the desert looked like…well, the desert as I have come to know it.  This stretch of the Sonora Desert has become rather familiar.  I’ve been on this trail eight times now and have covered more than 40 of its 70-plus miles…and this stretch is the furthest south that I have been.  There might be still one more track south of this trail-head, but being familiar with the area south of here, I doubt that I’ll head in that direction.

Black Canyon Trail heading north from Emery Henderson Trail-head

The early twists and turns of the trail, and the crossing and re-crossing of dry water-ways or creek-beds had brought me up a slight rise and pressed on toward a flatter plain that would soon give way to other and more declivities and inclines as I progressed northward.  I had seen this particular Saguaro from further back and wondered if the trail would take me anywhere near it.  If one were “looking for a sign” when lost out here in this desert wild, that someone might be tempted to view this as some kind of guide, or not….  I found it to be a significant landmark that, when coming from the other direction a few hours later, told me that I was very close to the end of my excursion.

Pointing Saguaro

I’ve seen mistletoe several times, but don’t know that I’ve ever posted any images of it.  Here it is in it’s context…

Desert mistletoe in Palo Verde tree

…and here it is again, but in a closer view.

Desert mistletoe close-up

The living and the dead of the eternal desert….

Ocotillo and Cholla cacti with desert tree skeleton and desert hills

An old-school trail marker, faded by severe summer suns….

Old-school trail marker

The trail was actually quite a bit lower than the surrounding desert in the below photo.  I thought it provided a nice shrub-height perspective.

Line of sight - eye level with Creosote and Saguaro cacti

I thought there would be more to this section of the trail than there actually was.  I came to the end much sooner than I thought I would and then stood there mid-trail thinking, “Is that all…really?”  It felt much too early to head back to the truck and I wasn’t inclined to marching further on the already familiar track, so I headed off-trail to explore a couple of the minor peaks in the area.  After reaching the top of one, I turned north and found a pleasant-enough view of the desert beyond…the trail toward the middle of the image is the one that would take me up toward the trail-head at Table Mesa Road.

Elevated perspective - desert hills panorama

I’m still adjusting to this desert hiking and have to admit that I’m sometimes disappointed in the landscapes and panoramas…sometimes they seem so featureless…or plain….  Someone once said that it’s not what we look at, but what we see that’s important…so I press myself to look more closely in my search for beauty out here…I try to look at things with a fascinated, scientific mind sometimes, framing things within contexts of what I’ve read and learned about this type of landscape.

Enchanted canyon - desert lichen

And when looking much closer, I find cliffs and canyons covered in lichen….not literal cliffs and canyons, of course, but ground-level rocks that are covered in the moisture-dependent and fragile, yet enduring yellow lichen that appears with more frequency than one would expect out here.

Ocotillo cactus and desert hills

I notice, too, the varieties of plant life and the slope and angles of the land as it rises and falls in its relationship with, among other things, the comings and goings of water, the sculpting that occurs from the drainage and collecting of its seasonal rains…and then I wonder at how it looked when it was born, this volcano-riddled desert…..

Misted desert ridges

From the top of another hill, I looked south and over the desert that pressed against roads and homes and saw the distant ridges that were clothed in the mists of commerce and civilization…smog…and was touched by the irony of this kind of “beauty” being the result of something so inherently unappealing.

Desert hillside grasses and Jojoba

When I was taking a biology class in college several years ago, one of our assignments was to conduct a field study or observation of the plants growing on one slope and compare them with the vegetation found living on an opposite hillside.  I had recollections of that experience when I was climbing the hill in the above image.  I had just been on a different slope that was only dirt and rock with very little of anything growing there and no evidence of animal-life, and then visited this particular slope that was covered with wild grasses and Jojoba shrubs, desert trees and cacti, and had wild burro and rabbit droppings, as well as lizards and chipmunk/squirrel type creatures scurrying about….what a difference there was to be seen in the opposite extremes of the lay of the land……when looking closer.

Desert density - view through a tree

I don’t know the name of the tree in the above image, but it provided an uncommon and inviting shade as I was descending the last hilltop of my afternoon explorations.

Classic Sonora Desert perspective

And lastly, an image that presents the contrast of near and far in the Arizona Sonora Desert…not very compelling when viewed from a distance, in my opinion, but strikingly beautiful and fascinating when experienced up close and personal.