Posts tagged “hiking

forest dreams in black and white

sometimes my daydreams are really thoughts about the things of which i would be dreaming, the words that describe what i would see or have seen, words i would use to tell you of the things i remember or wish to see again, so it might be appropriate to share those things in the black and white of words on paper, things which might be able to be described on the whole or in their collected parts, yet they are things which are beyond mere words when contemplated in the mixture of their richest essence, or in my experience, here

Dog Lake surround in B&W


Wasatch Mountain Wildflowers

Images of this nature used to be the normal fare for my spring and summer weekend hiking when I lived in Salt Lake City a few years ago…they were common enough punctuation marks in the trip narratives…highlights of color in the mountain landscapes…

…and now they are very occasional and intentional shared treasures of uncommon forays back into that used-to-be.

I don’t know the names of all of them, but when I do, I will share them, as I will here, above, with Queen Anne’s Lace, or Cow Parsnip…

…and the predominant flowers in the above image being Horsemint…a name shared with me by a fellow hiker after a chance encounter and then a follow-on comment on a post in those years ago.

Western Coneflowers above, something that I have also seen in the higher desert meadows of the Coconino National Forest just south of Flagstaff, Arizona.

The above resembles a type of gentian I have seen before, but I’m not sure how it is properly named.

A perfect Monday morning horizon above….

A trial for the newer camera…not entirely crispy, but still very clearly capturing dew drops on petals and leaves.

A richness of color for the eyes and morning crispness for the skin…and the mountain aroma of wet grasses and fragrant flowers….

I’m not sure about these, but there were tons of them on a western-facing slope as the sun was just over the mountains on the eastern side of the meadow….

Closer above and below….

And this one might be my favorite of the entire day…dew drops on Bluebells and leaves…I can still feel being there, making this particular photo, with anticipation and hope at what I would see on the computer when I brought the image home.

Life is full in that mountain environment, a feast for the senses at every turn.

And as I’ve shared previously, the Colorado Columbine, below, is my favorite flower, ever.

These were a first for me, the little purple Dr. Seuss flowers below….

And a fitting end for the post, I believe: a carpet of wildflowers with a Wasatch Mountain backdrop….

All images were made on 8-12-2019 during my very first hike from Brighton up to and from Lake Catherine.


Indian Mesa from afar

I was hoping for a second visit to the mesa when I launched out on the venture in May of this year, but there was absolutely no way I was going to make it from this approach.  My first visit was in November of 2014 and you can see the images by clicking here.  The locations presented in images 4-8 of that earlier post are all under water in this photograph.

We had an unusual amount of rain through the past Winter and Spring, which allowed Lake Pleasant to become fuller than it normally has been…or maybe it could have been as full in the past, but the water management people allowed more of it to flow past the dam…or there’s some better explanation of which I’m not aware.

At any rate, I didn’t make it to the mesa, but I did spend a nice hour or so out in the desert wilderness watching egrets, herons, cormorants, Canada geese, and other water fowl, hunting, fishing, and sailing about in the water on an overcast Arizona morning.


Antelope Island at Sunrise – Part Second

…continued.

There was simply too much to see, too many sights that demanded attention, contemplation, worship…and photographs.

My kids who still live in Salt Lake City had told me about the record snowfall for the past winter and spring; I had also read about it on one of the social media sites from the area that I follow.

I guess I expected that some of the earlier season’s snowmelt would have made it to The Great Salt Lake and would have raised the water level a bit…would have raised it “any” amount, actually.

Western Spotted Orb Weaver spider on Antelope Island

There was water, of course, mostly north of the causeway from my vantage point, enough to provide those morning reflections that are inspiring in and of themselves…

…and enough, too, to afford the many waterfowl a place to forage, play, rest, and provide still other morning reflections that cause occasional human observers to stop along their various ways to attend, contemplate, worship…and photograph.

Also striking were the morning’s colors…the peachy orangish pink of the waking sky, shining of themselves above, and in the myriad reflections below…

…the black, dark purple, blue and gray of the lake’s living water…

…and the sage, green, rust, and straw colors of the waterside vegetation.

Cast all of those, too, among the brightening gold and greens of the covered hillsides and coves…

…the yellow faces and bonnets of the solitary individuals and masses of sunflowers…

…and finally the rich blacks and browns of the wandering bison.

It was a feast for my desert dwelling eyes.


Antelope Island at Sunrise – Part First

It has been a favorite pastime of mine for the past nine or so years to hike and to explore the mountains and canyons or desert plains and hills in my surround…

…or in the case of the last five years, in addition to the deserts, etc., the forests, mountains, and mesas that are within a few hours’ drive of where I live.

When I have had good or better fortune, I have been able to go back to those preferred mountains and islands of my not so distant past…

…those beloved places up north, and hike and explore and simply exist again in the environment or locale that remains in my core as “home.”

At some point in the early part of those few years that I lived up north, it became preferable to start the specific adventure, to be at the designated trailhead, before sunrise.

There were fewer cars in the parking lots, fewer pairs of boots on the trails heading into the mountains…

…and a greater chance of capturing the essence of an undisturbed morning’s peace when starting at such an hour.

In application to my southern journeys, it became prudent to start this early, so as to avoid the greater heat of the day by completing the trek and returning to my truck before noon.

That said, I had determined to arrive at the trailhead to Frary Peak on Antelope Island before the sun rose and started warming the northern Utah August day.

Well…I made it to the Antelope Island State Park entrance before sunrise…

…but was then waylaid by the views north and south and east and west while driving on the causeway to the island, so I didn’t make it to the trailhead until nearly an hour after sunrise.

To be…


luminous

“The resistance to Copernicus, a kind of geocentrism, remains with us: We still talk about the Sun rising and the Sun setting. It is 2,200 years since Aristarchus, and our language still pretends that the earth does not turn.“ – Carl Sagan


Watson Lake, Prescott – and surround

Watson Lake is situated in an area known as the Granite Dells…weather-worn remnants from another geologic era.  There is another lake a bit to the north and west named Willow Creek Reservoir.  I haven’t been there yet, so that’s another Prescott adventure for the future.

The brochure for Watson Lake states that it is four miles northeast from downtown Prescott, Arizona…it is also 98 miles from my driveway in the far northwest valley of metropolitan Phoenix, more precisely, it’s that far to the parking lot for the Peavine Trail…a former rail-bed turned hiking trail that runs along the southern edge of the lake and beyond.

I follow an Arizona hiking page on another social media site and have seen numerous photos or posts about the lake and its very immediate environment.  I have not, however, seen any images from the trails that circle the lake, nothing from the greater setting in the Granite Dells…and, actually, nothing beyond intimate photos of water reflected boulders and beautiful sunsets.

The above image is the only one that made it into black and white.  The location was in the shadows of the cottonwood and other trees in the southeast corner of the lake, and while it provided great access for longer views while approaching the lake, it was difficult to capture significant color in the immediate area.

My original plan was to hike the majority, if not all, of the Peavine Trail.  I understood that it was somewhere between 11 and 12 miles in length, and that was what I wanted…a nice long hike…situated near the lake…close enough to it that I could make some images of my own.

Shortly after passing the above location, I ventured off down one of the shore trails and wandered around looking for photo worthy settings that weren’t too effected by the morning’s sun and shadows.  I didn’t have much luck….

So it was back on the Peavine Trail heading northeast again, parallel to the lake…and going away from it.

The lake and surrounding property now belongs to the City of Prescott…literature claims they took possession of it in 1997 in order to protect it and to use it for recreational purposes, etc.  In their efforts to make it more user-friendly, they placed weather-protected maps on sign posts along the way informing the hikers where they were in relation to the lake, which trails they could take, distances covered, etc.

When I noticed that I was going to be heading too far away from the lake on one of the trail-side maps, I decided to take the “Over the Hill Trail” back to the greater network of the “loop” trail that essentially circled the lake.  Given that much of the trail was over exposed rock and was not discernible as an actual trail, the Parks Department painted white dots on the granite to mark the way.  You can see one of the dots to the right and down from the tree in the center of the above image.

The “Over the Hill” trail led down to Granite Creek, which we can see in the lush green toward the bottom of the rocks….

When the Over the Hill trail intersected with the Granite Creek trail, it was initially unclear which way to go…right or left.  Heading toward the right led to waist-high grasses and very soggy walking, as the trail through that tall grass was actually under water.

Turning back to the left brings us back to a clear trail, still through tall grass, but alongside the creek, and then (not marked), heading over the metal walking bridge that you can see directly above the tree that is in and over the water.

Another thing that the juncture of the two trails mentioned above brought to me, was the sound of a waterfall…that very particular crashing and rushing of water kind of sound that means water is flowing hard and fast somewhere nearby.  As you can see above, it wasn’t exactly a “waterfall,” but is was definitely falling water…hard and fast and loud in the half-circle of the concrete and canyon walls.

This is still a desert, supposedly…high desert…5,000 plus feet in elevation…stream-side…marvelous…wonderful…green….

Exposed granite slabs, rolls, pressings…and I imagine it would be hotter than the blazes with reflected heat on a true mid-summer day…

The first glimpse of the lake after rounding the granite hills…now perched on what is the northwest corner/curve of the reservoir….

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The front side of the dam, above….

Heading back down south and west….

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A cormorant congress above….

Looking back north and east….

A closer look at the heron in the backwater toward the far south and west…nearing the Discovery Trail….

…and now into the deep cottonwood shadows that we skirted at the beginning of the hike…beautiful shade and cool breezes.


Watson Lake, Prescott – a study of textures and lines

I woke at 4:00 am, drove for two hours, and still arrived an hour or so after sunrise…considered doing the entire shoot in black and white…settled for color, though, as I could change the treatment later…changed the frame to more of a wide angle, similar to that of a large-screened television in format…found that I was disturbed by the breadth and mass of the sky in the viewfinder, actually felt off kilter, but I knew the setting would help for the more panoramic shots that would come later and didn’t want to keep fiddling with the camera…so I changed my point of view and came home with this….

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More to follow….


Watson Lake, Prescott – a prelude

 


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Watson Lake, Prescott – a backwater treasure