Posts tagged “Lone Peak Wilderness Area

A Glimpse at Bells Canyon’s Upper Falls

After my daughter and I hiked to the lower falls, as featured in this post, we continued up the trail for about another hour and then arrived at the upper falls.  Amid the spray and the treacherous footing on the soaked boulders and ground, it was difficult to manage another angle that would have provided a better or more clear perspective or presentation of this natural water-feature.

We stood in literal awe for several minutes, shifted our positions to gain different perspectives, stayed there again for several more minutes, and then retreated a bit into the woods that we had just come through to approach the falls.

You can still see the falling water through the trees to the right and behind my daughter in the above photo, so you can probably imagine how loud it must have been to be so close.  There was a pervasive serenity, sitting there in the woods, even with the roaring of the falls as near as they were…with the crashing water on the granite boulders and then the rushing of the stream in front of us….

White patches up in the trees caught my eye….

What a refreshing spray after the steep hike to get there…melted snow…living water….

Just a little further downstream is a bridge that has been chained to the trees on both sides of the bank to prevent the rising and rushing stream from carrying it away.  There is a trail that you can take off into the shoulder-high brush that will lead you in a near circular manner out and up to the area just upstream from the top of the falls…and will also eventually lead you to the upper reservoir and beyond.

If you’d like to see an image of the falls later in the season, you can click here to see what they looked like in August of 2013.


Red Pine Lake reflections

Those are Broads Fork Twin Peaks behind the larger tree and just to the right of the center of the image…they are the highest peaks in the portion of the Wasatch Mountains that form the eastern geographic boundary of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Red Pine Lake, Wasatch Mountains, Utah


Bridge over Red Pine Stream

I made this photo while on the way to Red Pine Lake near the end of December, 2013.  You can click here to see a strikingly different image of the same location that I made in September, 2012.  If you cross this bridge and follow the trail to its end, you will find yourself near the three alpine lakes of Maybird Gulch.  I have only made the trip once in my three years here in the Wasatch…a short foray into the area that found me hopping unsteadily from one treacherously snow-covered boulder to another around the lower lake.  It was rather nerve wracking and I haven’t been back…but I will get there again in the warmer months when the green mountains are more suited to exploration.

Snow-covered bridge over Red Pine Stream


Image

Red Pine Lake in September

Red Pine Lake panorama


Upper Red Pine Lake under Clouds

If you’ve been following the blog for a while, you might remember a few posts from last year that highlighted the same lake…and if you do remember those images, you might also recall that they sky was bright in its blueness and reflected wonderfully in the surface of the lake.  It is amazing how different a place can appear when the clouds and lighting are so strikingly different.  Coincidentally, these images below were made exactly one year later than the ones in the earlier posts…to the day.

Upper Red Pine Lake under clouds 1

If you’d like to visit those earlier images, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the Red Pine Lake category to be taken to a continuous roll of the earlier posts and photographs.

Upper Red Pine Lake under Clouds 2

And for those of you who are interested, Upper Red Pine Lake is at about 10,000 feet in elevation…400 feet higher than Red Pine Lake.  The lakes are situated in Red Pine Canyon, one of the tributary canyons or forks that extend south from Little Cottonwood Canyon…just south and east of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA…in the Lone Peak Wilderness Area of the Wasatch National Forest.  The hike from the trail-head to the upper lake is approximately four miles in length, has an elevation gain of about 2,500 feet, and may take you from 2.5 to 3.5 hours to accomplish…depending on your fitness level……….and how often you stop to make photographs….