Posts tagged “Mill Creek Canyon

Snow Cones


Reflection

I suppose the word has a couple of meanings….

My Little One….


Trail


The Un-Fallen


Life on Life


Lines and Shadows

One of the remarkable things about being the first person out on the trail after a snow-fall is that the first visage with the unblemished snow will not exist again until it snows significantly enough to cover all the tracks…and that might be months or a year away.  So it was with a bit of reluctance, then, that I continued along the trail, being the one to mark-up the perfect snow-fall…the one to taint the treasure that only existed for a few hours.  Here’s some mind-boggling beauty for you…

The photos were all taken along the Pipeline Trail in Mill Creek Canyon, Salt Lake City, USA.


Slices


Blue and White


Angles


Trees in Silhouette

Treeline in Mill Creek Canyon during the sun’s waking…beautiful magic of light and clouds and the distance of a watching lens.


Sand or Snow?

On first glance, it looked like dried-out salt grass along the beach sticking up through beautiful white sand…

These images were taken along the Pipeline Trail between Burch Hollow and Elbow Fork in Mill Creek Canyon, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.


Water and Ice

Somehow the element of it being really cold doesn’t play into the equation when viewing this natural beauty…except when standing and kneeling next to the edge of the stream…or leaning over it to take the picture, and hoping that I don’t slip and fall in….

These were taken over a stream near Church Fork, just down the hill a little ways from Pipeline Trail on the way to Burch Hollow and Elbow Fork…curious names of places in Mill Creek Canyon, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.


So beautiful it almost hurts….

Mill Creek Canyon is one of the three main natural canyons in the Wasatch Mountains that provide the eastern border of Salt Lake City, Utah.

On the First of November of each year, the parks personnel close the road at the five-mile mark in the canyon and do not plow it beyond that point.  The main road then becomes a favored location for cross-country skiers to practice their skills in climbing upward for six miles or more and then racing down the smooth pathway back toward the gate.

There are also numerous trails that lead up and into and along-side the various other mini-canyons and gulches that fill the mountain area to the sides of the canyon proper.

On this particular Sunday morning and afternoon, I took the Pipeline trail for about two miles until it reached Elbow Fork, and then took the trail that leads to Mount Aire and/or Lamb’s Canyon.

I chose to go to Lamb’s Canyon pass, which was close to another two miles up and into the mountains.

Lucky for me, I had my gaiters on, because the snow quickly became six to twelve inches deep, depending on where the trail lay under trees or in clearings where there was nothing to prevent more snow from accumulating.

After I came to what I thought might have been Lamb’s Canyon pass or the ridge that was my destination (where the previous hikers and snow-shoe-ers had turned around), I continued down and along what I perceived to still be the trail that actually led to Lamb’s Canyon.  I followed some large deer or elk or moose tracks for another few hundred yards…until the snow was deep enough that my knees were getting cold from the snow above my gaiters….and decided that it was time to turn around.

At any rate, it was a beautiful hike into the snow-covered forests of Mill Creek Canyon.


Some of My Favorite Places

Life changes as it does and sometimes brings with it a peace that goes beyond words.  My new home and new environment have returned my soul to the place where it was born.  It is not the same locale where I fell in love with the outdoors, but the geography and essence are the same.  Gone are the big city and desert…and here are the mountains…and peace restored.  These are some of my new favorite places: