Posts tagged “Salt Lake City nature

Red Pine Lake reflections

Those are Broads Fork Twin Peaks behind the larger tree and just to the right of the center of the image…they are the highest peaks in the portion of the Wasatch Mountains that form the eastern geographic boundary of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.

Red Pine Lake, Wasatch Mountains, Utah

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the preaching of pine trees

“Few are altogether deaf to the preaching of pine trees. Their sermons on the mountains go to our hearts; and if people in general could be got into the woods, even for once, to hear the trees speak for themselves, all difficulties in the way of forest preservation would vanish.” 

 – John Muir

Wasatch Mntn Forest in color


Cardiff Fork…end….

Hmm…I suppose I should have gotten around to this one a while ago, as we’re approaching the end of the year and I made these images close to four months ago….the snow you see in some of the images is actually from last winter and we’re quickly approaching the snows from this coming winter.  In fact, if I were to head back to Cardiff Fork today, I believe I’d encounter some new snow to share with you.

Cardiff Fork at the cirque

I don’t know how many of you have had the opportunity to hike into the mountains at the end of June, get all hot and sweaty, soaked shirt and everything, and then reach into a pile of snow and make a nice snow-ball to eat and cool yourselves down with, but it’s a wonderful treat!  My son and I each had a large, grapefruit-sized snowball and it was fantastic…so refreshing!

Cardiff Fork over the scree field and down the valley

The above photo was taken while we were sitting at the furthest end of the fork…about four miles into the mountains, inside of the cirque that was full of broken basalt-looking rock that has tumbled down from the ridges above over the years.

Cardiff Fork moon over mountain ridge

I don’t really have much more to tell you about the canyon/fork and its associated mining history, but I thought you might enjoy seeing a few more photos of the geography and beautiful landscape of the area.  If we were to climb to the top of the ridge in the below photo, we would be looking west and into Mineral Fork….

Cardiff Fork mountains and slabs

If you can find the little finger of trees that is way down and to the left of the peak that is in the upper right corner (of the below photo), actually located between the center and right large pine/fir trees, that is where we were sitting while eating the snow-balls…where my son and I were sitting when I made the first and second photos above…we were just to the left of that little finger of trees….

Cardiff Fork snow and cirque and pines

Also in the above photo, if you were on the ridge just below the clouds in the upper left corner, you could look south and down into Little Cottonwood Canyon…the little ski town of Alta would be off toward the left…and the metropolitan area of the Salt Lake Valley would be way off to the right…..

Cardiff Fork mountainside wildflowers

The below photo is from the other side of the fork, looking across the valley area and onto the old Cardiff Mine area.  If you’ll recall the photos from the first post in this series, Cardiff Fork…beginning…, photo #8, that’s the same mine area that you can see in this below photo, but from a distance now, and with the ore sorter in the foreground.

Cardiff Fork ore sorter from afar

My son is providing a bit of perspective for us…he’s about 6’3″…so the ore sorter is rather large…..

Cardiff Fork ore sorter, how big is it?

While my son’s not in the below photo, he was standing near the lower right edge/corner of the sorter and his head came to right about the center of that large beam that is right above the tree….

Cardiff Fork Ore Sorter Iconic image

…and this last photo is looking back up into Cardiff Fork as my son and I were nearing the end of the return hike out of the canyon……

Cardiff Fork looking back

That’s all folks…I hope you’ve enjoyed the hike through Cardiff Fork.  If you’d like to view all three posts from the series in one continuous stream, you can go to the bottom of the page and click on “Cardiff Fork” under the Category widget…that will bring you all three posts together.  Thank you again for visiting and for spending a bit of your time with me….


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Red Pine Lake in September

Red Pine Lake panorama


Upper Red Pine Lake under Clouds

If you’ve been following the blog for a while, you might remember a few posts from last year that highlighted the same lake…and if you do remember those images, you might also recall that they sky was bright in its blueness and reflected wonderfully in the surface of the lake.  It is amazing how different a place can appear when the clouds and lighting are so strikingly different.  Coincidentally, these images below were made exactly one year later than the ones in the earlier posts…to the day.

Upper Red Pine Lake under clouds 1

If you’d like to visit those earlier images, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the Red Pine Lake category to be taken to a continuous roll of the earlier posts and photographs.

Upper Red Pine Lake under Clouds 2

And for those of you who are interested, Upper Red Pine Lake is at about 10,000 feet in elevation…400 feet higher than Red Pine Lake.  The lakes are situated in Red Pine Canyon, one of the tributary canyons or forks that extend south from Little Cottonwood Canyon…just south and east of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA…in the Lone Peak Wilderness Area of the Wasatch National Forest.  The hike from the trail-head to the upper lake is approximately four miles in length, has an elevation gain of about 2,500 feet, and may take you from 2.5 to 3.5 hours to accomplish…depending on your fitness level……….and how often you stop to make photographs….


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Bowman Fork Wildflowers

Bowman Fork Wildflowers with Grandeur Peak and Millcreek Ridge


Lake Florence in the Morning

You might remember the lake from last year when I did the posts on the Sister Lakes of the Wasatch Mountains.  You can click on “Sister Lakes – Lake Florence” to learn more about this lake.  The earlier post also has links to the other Sister Lakes if you’re interested in the more complete history of the area.

Lake Florence in the morning


Lake Desolation from above….

You saw the mountainside flower garden just below the other side of the ridge here…and the image below is what you can see when you look down the ridge in the opposite direction.  From approximately 9,600 feet in elevation, you can see out through Millcreek Canyon, clear across the Salt Lake Valley, and visualize the open pit mine on the eastern face of the Oquirrh Mountains…the western geographical boundary of the Valley….

Lake Desolation from above


Dromedary Peak…twice…..

This is an early-June, 2013 photograph of one of the iconic mountains that provide a backdrop to the Sister Lakes in the Wasatch Mountains of Utah.  Found at the terminus of the drainage or tributary canyon, Mill B South, it is a frequent site and common reference when trying to orient one’s self while hiking in this area of Big Cottonwood Canyon.  If you’d like to see other images of Dromedary Peak, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and type its name in the search widget to be provided with a list of other posts that contain photos from other seasons.

Dromedary Peak reflection


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Lake Lillian – another rendition

Sundial Peak and Lake Lillian in the Wasatch Mountains