Posts tagged “Salt Lake City photography

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East of the Wasatch Mountains

Uintah Mountains east of Wasatch Mountain Range


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In dreaming, I saw a dark valley….

Dark Valley of Mineral Fork


Mineral Fork in June…part two….

Here we are again, picking up where we left-off at the end of the other post, Mineral Fork in June…part one….  This is the mining artifact that we couldn’t really see at the end of the trail in the next to last photo of the other post…and this is also the location where I was standing when looking down upon the person and trail in the very last photo of the previous post.

Mineral Fork Johnson Regulator Mine artifacts

And another “people shot” below to help add some perspective to the grandness of the location….

Mineral Fork human perspective

The below photo shows the trail in August of last year, 2012…taken at essentially the same location…so you can see how much of it is covered with snow in the above photo.

Mineral Fork trail August 2012

This is my first sighting of a mountain goat out in the wild, ever.  I’ve heard and read that they were in the area….and are usually found very high in the more rocky aspects of the Wasatch Mountains….  This one happened to be waaaaaay up on the side of the cirque, or bowl, at the end of the fork/valley….and I was waaaaaay down on the trail, so this is the best photo that  I could get…but you can still tell what it is…right?

Mountain Goat in Mineral Fork

Below, my son is sitting on a rock about 50-75 yards down from the head-water, or origin, of the stream that runs the entire length of Mineral Fork and joins Big Cottonwood Stream at the other end, roughly four miles away.  Imagine walking about that distance back up into the bowl that is behind him and listening to water running under the rocks….  It was quite loud…almost rushing, as it passed beneath the scree and finally made its way out from under the rock and became a recognizable stream…..and Holy Buddha, that was some cold water!

Mineral Fork stream headwater

And here I am on a rock in the middle of the nascent stream…loving my little spot in the mountains…..

Scott at Mineral Fork stream

My son and I followed this lower switchback trail up to the higher switchbacks (that you can see in the earlier post), but went off trail and followed the stream through its windings and droppings in elevation back down to a a similar location on the opposite side of the canyon…which affords us this distant look at the trail as it begins to climb upward.  These prominent switchbacks cause this trail to be referred to as the “zigzag trail” in various literature on the area…and can be seen clearly from the mountain ridges several miles to the north.

Mineral Fork early switchbacks from afar

Here’s another view of the zigzag trail, below, that I’ve provided to help with scale and proportion again….  Can you see the two people highlighted against the snow…slightly below and to the left of the center of the photo?

Mineral Fork people perspective against the snow

This is the eastern ridge of Mineral Fork…facing south…and illuminated with the full brightness of the afternoon sun.

Mineral Fork eastern ridge

And this is a final look at Mineral Fork…looking backwards, though, toward its beginning at Big Cottonwood Canyon.

Mineral Fork mountain vista

If you’d like to see a visual reference to where Mineral Fork is situated in Big Cottonwood Canyon itself, you can click on this link to be taken to my last post that includes a map of the area….find the central spine of mountains in the approximate middle of the map and then find the second purple pin up from the bottom of the image.

As always, thank you for being here, for spending a bit of your time with me…I hope you’ve enjoyed exploring another section of the Wasatch Mountains, just east of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.


Mineral Fork in June…part one….

In the grand scheme of things, I’ve not lived near the trails and canyons of the Wasatch Mountains for very long…but it seems that I have lived here long enough to hike on some of the trails more than a few times now.  I have a map above my desk at work and I place a colored pin at the terminus of each hike I’ve made over the last few years…a yellow pin for a place that I’ve been only once, pink for the second time, and purple for three or more times.  I’m thinking about a red pin for places that I’ve been ten or more times, but so far, I have only one place that I could use it and have simply not gotten around to actually doing so yet.

Mineral Fork - looking down the valley

At any rate, this hike into Mineral Fork allowed me to place a purple pin on my map…it was my third venture into the area, this tributary canyon or drainage that runs south from Big Cottonwood Canyon.  My first adventure was in the fall of 2011 and it was crazy beautiful with the changing colors of the aspen and other deciduous trees and bushes.  You can view some of the photos from that trip by clicking here.  Did you notice the person in the below photo…?  He’s about 2/3 of the way up the trail from where it comes out of the shadow…and a little bit before the trail turns sharply back to the left at that first switchback….

Mineral Fork early switchbacks

My second trip into Mineral Fork was in August of last year and I didn’t do much of a post on it, just shared some images of the wildflowers, which you can see here.

Mineral Fork looking back

On those first two hikes, I traveled alone and stopped often to marvel at the mass of nature that surrounded me…and stopped to take some photos so that I would have proof of my journeys and something to share with my family and friends who didn’t accompany me out and into the canyons.  My older son joined me on this most recent trip…and aside from the utility of having a constant human-sized reference to add perspective to some of my photos, it was nice to have a companion join me in seeing the area for his first time…which caused me to see and notice things that I hadn’t seen on my other adventures.

Wasatch Mine in Mineral Fork

Even though we made the hike during the third week of June, we still encountered the lingering mountain snow on the trails.  The switchback trail is usually wide enough for two people to walk side by side….

Mineral Fork snowy switchbacks in the cirque

…but as you can see in the next two photos, we were often down to only a single track of exposed rock….

Mineral Fork snow covered switchback trail

…and at a couple of points along the way, we actually had to make new tracks into the crusted and melting snow so that we could continue down the trail.  If you zoom-in a bit on the below photo, you might be able to see an artifact of the abandoned Regulator-Johnson mine at the far end of the trail……or maybe not….

Mineral Fork approaching the terminus

The view from the last photo is looking toward the north-east from the end of the trail…the cone of rock to the right of the image is Kessler Peak, and the mountains off in the distance is the northern ridge or slope of Big Cottonwood Canyon…and there’s another person in the below photo, as well…he’s sitting on a rock on the left side of the trail, just above the snow at the bottom of the image.

Mineral Fork looking down from the terminus

Stay tuned for the second part….coming soon…..


Dwarf Waterleaf in Millcreek Canyon

As I was going through my back-log of blog posts this morning, I came across John M. Smith’s post, Bluebells and Beech, and remembered that I was going to do a similar post on some Utah wildflowers that I had noticed after viewing Andy Hooker’s post, Bluebells 2013.

Dwarf Waterleaf along Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon, Utah

My older son and I were on the way to one of our Sunday morning hiking destinations, walking the Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon, just east of Salt Lake City proper.  While I have walked this trail more than a dozen times over the past few years, I have never noticed the profusion of a single type of wildflower like I did on this particular morning….and it was too good to resist…taking a break in the early part of the hike to kneel in the wild grass and flowers for a few minutes to take a few (?) pictures…..

Blanket of Dwarf Waterleaf, Millcreek Canyon, Utah

USWildflowers.com identifies these little beauties as being Dwarf Waterleaf, Bullhead Waterleaf…or Cat’s Breeches…with the scientific name of Hydrophyllum capitatum, for those of you interested in such things.  I’m sorry I can’t name the trees…but here you are anyway with the blanket of spring wildflowers on a beautiful Spring morning….as my son and I were heading to our own version of Sunday services……

Dwarf Waterleaf close-up, Millcreek Canyon, Utah


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Sunday Morning Reflections

Lake Blanche reflections, Wasatch Mountains, Utah


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Crossing Little Cottonwood Canyon Stream

Fallen trees over Little Cottonwood Canyon Stream Utah


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Wasatch Mountain Springtime

Springtime Wasatch Mountain Vista


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together

Boys walking trail in Mill D South


City Paint 13 – Urban Jungle Mural

Six months after I posted City Paint 5.1 – Ironclad Tattoo Re-do, the artist, Shae Petersen (AKA: FiftyK), happened to stumble across my blog and commented on the photos.  He also informed me that he had just completed another mural…and invited me to stop-by for a visit.

Urban Jungle Mural Panorama

I hope you’ll forgive the bit of sun-flare in the first three photos.  I managed to find someone nearby who allowed me into the fenced and locked property at almost noon on a mid-week day…so I couldn’t be choosy with the shooting arrangements…full sun overhead…shadows near the mural…anyway…I hope you’ll enjoy the images despite their flaws….

Urban Jungle Mural Leaping Tiger

Shae told me that he had been commissioned by the Utah Arts Alliance to paint the Urban Jungle mural.

Urban Jungle Mural Iguana by Lake

He said that it will be the backdrop feature for a new urban-art garden that will be constructed in the empty lot that is immediately in front of the mural.  The painting is actually on a reception center building located at 615 West 100 South in Salt Lake City.

Urban Jungle Mural Primates by Buildings

When I asked him about the theme and how much liberty he and Chew had in creating the mural, he said that they were essentially told to use their discretion and make it however they wanted to.

Urban Jungle Mural leaping tiger close-up

Shae told me that he and another artist, Chew, the owner of Mark’s Ark combined their talents to create the mural that they have named “Urban Jungle.”

Urban Jungle Mural Mark's Ark underwater

He also told me that Chew had worked on other murals that you may have seen here on my blog… City Paint 1 – 5 Monkeys Bar and City Paint 3 – 2012 – The End?, as well as the recently posted City Paint 12.2 – 2020…Perfect Vision, and the Ironclad Tattoo mural that I mentioned above.

Urban Jungle Mural Iguana close-up

Urban Jungle Mural contemplative gorilla

Urban Jungle Mural helicopter city-scape

He said the urban jungle theme just struck them as appropriate…the animals don’t really have any significance in their selection or appearance…just seemed that they belonged there.

Urban Jungle Mural primates and buildings

Urban Jungle Mural standing gorilla

Urban Jungle Mural posturing juvenile gorilla

The mural is 127 feet in length and took the artists about two weeks to complete…for a cost of $1500.00….

Urban Jungle Mural elephant in the city

You can follow this link to view more of Shae’s work.

Urban Jungle Mural FiftyK.Net signature

Thank you for spending a bit of your day with me.  I hope you enjoyed the fantastically colored and skillfully rendered mural as much as I did.  If you’d like to view more of the City Paint Series, as well as other tidbits of street art and graffiti that I’ve found in the Salt Lake City area, you can scroll to the bottom of the page, find the “Categories” widget, and then click on “Street Art – Graffiti.”