Posts tagged “Salt Lake City photography

“…the view from up there…”

If you remember this post, living anyway, you might remember reading in the comments that Allen mentioned that he’d like to see the view from up there.  Well, these photos are not from exactly up there, but they’re from a location that’s pretty close to being up there….

View from Days Fork Cardiff Fork Ridge 1

You’ll notice that the pictures in first to fourth order go from left to right in the landscape…and you’ll notice that it’s a little brown and bleak…but the photos were taken in November after an earlier light winter and dry summer….

View from Days Fork Cardiff Ridge 2

The photos were taken on the ridge between Days Fork and Cardiff Fork, looking west and down into Cardiff Fork.  The road was used for mining efforts over the years…which have been finished for about four decades.

View from Days Fork Cardiff Ridge 3

I have photos of the mining artifacts from earlier in the summer…just haven’t gotten around to making a post yet….  If you’ll look closely (or click on the photo to magnify it) in the second photo, at the largest patch of snow closest to the bottom right-hand corner of the image, you can see a small rectangle…that’s the foundation remaining from the miners’ bunk house…you can also see it in the third photograph…but you might have to hunt for it a little bit…in the lower quarter of the image and toward the left side….

View from Days Fork Cardiff Ridge 4


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doorway to peace

doorway to peace


urban pastoral

My son and I went exploring in the area where one might find the setting for the images from the Homestead Series…a bit north and west of Salt Lake City proper…heading up into the next county…and up closer to The Great Salt Lake…where one can also find horses and cows grazing in open fields, hear domesticated geese honking from their farm-side ponds, and experience the exhilarating scent of a steaming manure pile on a crispy winter morning.  If you’ll look toward the upper edge of this photograph, you’ll notice a radio tower…and the silhouette images of some of Salt Lake City’s downtown buildings….

foggy stream with reeds


Dromedary Peak under Snow

It looks a little different than it did in this earlier post…but I believe it’s still full of an incredible and natural beauty….

Dromedary Peak under Snow


Gobbler’s Knob from afar….

This bit of bowl-shaped terrain in the distance was named “Gobblers’ Knob,” supposedly, because of the abundance of wild turkeys found in the vicinity….  I made the photo from the trail on the opposite slope heading toward Grandeur Peak in Millcreek Canyon…another part of the Wasatch Mountain range that forms the eastern border of the greater Salt Lake Valley.  ‘Twas a beautiful winter morn’.

Gobbler's Knob from afar


Wintery Wasatch Mountains

This is the south-facing ridge of the mountains that separate Big Cottonwood Canyon from Millcreek Canyon…as it appears when one is hiking Mill B South, the trail that leads to The Sister Lakes….  This is what you see when you turn around to check your back-trail….

Wasatch Mountains with Snow


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Winter in the Park

Snowy picnic table at Liberty Park, Salt Lake City Utah


Oquirrh Mountain Cloudy Panorama

I might have mentioned it in the past, but the Oquirrh (pronounced like “ocher”) Mountains form the western boundary of the greater Salt Lake Valley….

Oquirrh Mountains cloudy panorama


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“…like the first morning…”

Wasatch Mountain Morning


another study of figures in fog

two trees in the fog

bridge with reeds and fog

colored tree cluster in the fog

three trees with silhouettes in the fog


Millcreek Canyon in Winter – Contrasting Images

Millcreek Winter in black and white

Millcreek Winter in color


Liberty Park in December

Liberty Park Pond Island Reflection

Liberty Park Bridge in December

Liberty Park pond portrait in December


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and one….

Geese in the fog


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clarification

trees in fog


Twin Peaks from afar…in September

A few months ago, I hiked up Porter Fork from its trail-head in Millcreek Canyon, essentially did the loop or horseshoe-shaped trail around Mt. Raymond, and then went down Bowman Fork back to its trail-head in Millcreek Canyon.  Near the base of Mt. Raymond, which is technically on the north side of Big Cottonwood Canyon and faces south, you can see into the other drainages or tributary canyons that lie perpendicular and head in a southerly direction from Big Cottonwood Canyon, which runs east and west; I hope all of that makes sense.  At any rate, you can see Twin Peaks (11,330/11,328 ft) near the top center of this image…the drainage that is down and slightly to the left of the peaks is Broads Fork…and if you take the ridge-line to the left, you might notice Dromedary Peak (11,107 ft) as the last prominence…which you might remember is just above and to the right/west of Lake Blanche and the other Sister Lakes…and lie in the drainage called, Mill B South.  When I’m out hiking, I always find it fascinating to encounter new views or perspectives of the places I’ve visited in the mountains and canyons…such wonderful and beautiful places…..

To see more images of Twin Peaks, Broads Fork, Dromedary Peak, and Lake Blanche, you can scroll down and utilize the “Search” feature near the end of the page to locate several posts about those subjects.

Twin Peaks from afar in September


Homestead rustic

This is the last of five images in the Homestead series…each photograph was taken from a different perspective and processed with a different finish.  To view the other four photos, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and then click on “Homestead Series” under the Categories list.

Homestead rustic view


a study of figures in fog

five trees in fog with silhouettes

trees and bridge and silhouettes in fog

one tree with silhouettes in fog

tree cluster with silhouettes in fog


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cover me

overhanging trees in fog


Winter Mountain Morning

Granite mountain in clouds


Sundial Peak in Winter

You might remember Sundial Peak from various posts over the summer…and into the fall…possibly from the one dedicated specifically to Lake Blanche, one of the Sister Lakes located at the end of the drainage, Mill B South, up in Big Cottonwood Canyon…tucked away in the Wasatch Mountains…just south and east of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA….  It took twice as long to get there with the deep, deep snow…even with snow-shoes…but, oh, what a reward at the end…..

Sundial Peak in Winter


Homestead in sepia

It might be the color, but this rendering strikes me more as an abandoned dwelling…maybe it’s because the mountains and trees that were visible in the other versions are missing and there is a feeling of derelict solitude here…I’m not sure….  This is the fourth of five images in the Homestead series…to see the other photographs, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Homestead Series under the Categories icon.

Homestead in sepia


Ice Climbing in Little Cottonwood Canyon, Utah

My older son and I noticed these ice climbers last Sunday as we were heading up the Little Cottonwood Canyon trail from the Mormon Temple Quarry near the mouth of the canyon.  While I have never participated in the sport, I have found myself up near their location on the side of the mountain when I was collecting images for the posts Life on a Rock, Scale or perspective… and Little Cottonwood Canyon Vistas.

Ice Climbers on South Wall of Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah

If you are having difficulty finding the three climbers, they are just to the right and below of the center of the above photograph…three climbers, two at the top, and one in blue toward the bottom of the icy cascade that is near the horizontal middle of the image.

Ice Climbers on Frozen Falls in Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah

You might remember the post from December, 2011, when I shared my first encounter/discovery of ice climbers in the Little Cottonwood Canyon.  The location from I Found a Frozen Waterfall is probably another mile up into the canyon and on the same side of the mountain, or canyon wall.

Ice Climber placing anchor Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah

Ice Climbers at top and bottom of falls in Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah

The first four images were from the beginning of our hike, shortly after 9:00 a.m. …and before the sun had made its way over the canyon walls…and the last two photos were taken at the end of the hike, close to four hours later.  While it was still an overcast day, the light had changed the appearance of the snow and canyon from the blue hues to the more gray and subdued colors that are not uncommon for our winter mountains.

Solo ice climber Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah

My son, with his more-than-slightly younger ears, could hear the climbers’ picks smacking into the icy walls, just a “tick…tick……tick” from across the hundreds of yards that separated us, the sound traveling easily in the quiet mountain air, from however many feet above us.

Solo ice climber close-up Little Cottonwood Canyon Utah


Homestead with cloudy panorama

This is the third of five images in the Homestead series…different images of the same abandoned buildings on a property located a few miles north of the Salt Lake City airport.  If you look through the trees on the left side of the photograph, and immediately above the second fence post from the left, you can see the air-traffic control tower…and the mountains in the background are the extreme northern end of the Oquirrh Mountains, the range that forms the western boundary of the Salt Lake Valley.  To provide a bit more of a location reference, the Great Salt Lake is a few miles to the back and right of the image….  To see the other photographs in the Homestead series, you can scroll to the bottom of the page and click on Homestead Series under the Categories icon.

Homestead with cloudy panorama


Dromedary Peak in January

I think it rather looks like a pencil drawing…but this is the image, essentially right out of the camera…I have only cropped and framed it…not messed with the color in the least.  If you’d like a summer comparison, you can click these words to be taken back to an earlier post that shared images from July, 2012.

Dromedary Peak in January