Posts tagged “Utah County

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on the road

Motorists and cyclists on Cedar Fort Road, Utah County, Utah

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Fields of Cedar Valley

From looking at a map of the area, I want to say that the draw (the “V” area just above the fence-posts) is either Pole Canyon or Four Mile Canyon…but I’m not certain…..  This was taken facing north from Cedar Fort Road…out in Utah County…a bit north of Eagle Mountain.

Oquirrh Mountains over Cedar Valley fields


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waiting in line

irrigation equipment with mountain background


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purple hills and white mountains

purple fields and white mountains


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lakeside

Reeds and trees lakeside, Utah Lake, Utah County, Utah


A tractor for Timpanogos

There are acres and acres of fields just north of the Cedar Fort road that leads into the Cedar Valley of Utah County and beyond.  A week or so ago, I shared a photo, “farm and mountain panorama,” that had a tractor in a field beneath the snow-covered Oquirrh Mountains, the range that provides the western border for the Salt Lake Valley…and contributes to the north-western border of Cedar Valley.  I returned to the area the following weekend and made some photos while facing the other direction…toward the Wasatch Mountains in general, and toward this mass of rock and earth, specifically, that is known as Mount Timpanogos…a very prominent feature of the eastern skyline for much of Utah County…which is located directly south of the Salt Lake Valley…and Salt Lake County proper.

Tractor in field under Mt Timpanogos, Utah County, Utah


Tintic Standard Reduction Mill

A week or so ago, my second son and I headed out into the beyond…took a tour around Utah Lake…essentially followed in the tire-tracks of  my third son who had made the trip on his bike last summer.  At the southern end of the lake, the road heads back east.  About two and a half miles past the town of Goshen, you can see what appears to be the remains of something on the side of a mountain. Even from a distance, you can also see that it has been frequented by taggers and graffiti artists.  My cycling son had mentioned the ruins after his ride and suggested that we needed to check it out sometime.

Tintic Standard Reduction Mill from afar

After leaving this site and finding a stronger signal for his phone, my second son determined that these were/are the ruins of the Tintic Standard Reduction Mill…an ore processing facility that was built between 1919-1921…and only used for four years…so it has been standing vacant and abandoned since 1925.  For a very brief history of the mill, you can click on the highlighted name to be taken to the Wiki article that provides a bit of information.

Tintic Mill crop zoom

This link to the Historic American Engineering Record provides a more extensive history…and shows us what the ruins looked like back in 1971, after it had been abandoned for 46 years, and before a select demographic of our country decided that they needed to decorate the place with their spray-painted opinions and expressions of art.  The following images represent what the place looks like today…42 years after the essentially “clean” images from 1971…and 88 years after it was abandoned.

Approaching the Tintic Reduction Mill

The entirety of the mill structure spans an elevation equivalent to eight stories of a building and is situated on the side of Warm Springs Mountain, 5,535 ft elev.

Tintic Mill 1

The circular structures are leaching vats where the crushed ore would be chemically processed to remove the silver, copper, lead, and gold.

Tintic Mill 2

Tintic Mill 3

Don’t know enough about it to even guess what the circular things below were/are….

Tintic Mill 4

Under the vats…supports…drains(?)…retention walls….

Tintic Mill 5

The inside of a leaching vat…

Inside a leaching vat, Tintic Reduction Mill

These are the ore bins toward the right of the photo…above the leaching vats.

Tintic Mill 6

A view looking over the ore bins…with my son at the far end.

Tintic Mill 7

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Tintic Mill 8

My son looking into the silver precipitator…the square-shaped structure with the conical (inverted pyramids) chute underneath…situated to the left of the leaching vats in the third photo above.

Tintic Mill  9

If you click on the link for the Historic American Engineering Record, you can see the diagrams that identify the various parts of the mill that I have named in the post…the leaching vats, silver precipitator, ore bins, roaster, etc….

I believe that’s the water tank in the photo below…with Savannah and Shilo painted on it…….and if you look in the very first photo above…and notice the somewhat removed, shadowy structure to the very bottom right, those are the lead precipitate bins…..

Tintic Mill 10

Looking over the ore bins…in the opposite direction.

Tintic Mill 11

The front of the roaster section….

Tintic Mill 12

I believe the space between the large structure on the right side of the image and the broken-through wall (that general area) is where the crusher was located…and the large structure is where the ore was roasted.

Tintic Mill 13

Warm Springs pond/lake below the mill….

Tintic Mill 14

Tintic Mill 15

Looking over the roaster, ore bins, silver precipitator, and leaching vats….

Tintic Mill 16

The below image is from the highest, developed area of the mill…where I was standing on the remaining foundation of what I believe you can see in the very top left corner of the last image of the post.

Tintic Mill 17

The Tintic Standard Reduction Mill before its decline….

Tintic Standard Reduction Mill Utah State Historical Society Digital Image - Copyright 2002

Hmm…so this post was quite a bit longer than my normal fare…but I hope you enjoyed it anyway…..

As always, thank you for being here.


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Cedar Fort fields and mountains in black and white

Cedar Fort mountain vista in black and white


bird on a…line….

she sang and sang…and the quiet was sad without her….

bird on a line with mountain in background


the past and passing

abandoned rail-line, Tintic Standard Reduction Mill, Goshen, Utah