Posts tagged “Utah hiking

Toward Frary Peak on Antelope Island – Part Middle

We pick-up this post where we ended the last one, nearly the same spot, slightly different perspective, and a few/many feet further up the trail.

The hiking figure below me on the trail is continuing on her trek upwards, as well, drawing nearer, becoming more defined, and still providing an excellent gauge for perspective.  She is near the center of the below image….

Looking back over these photographs, I am still held by the colors and the expanse of vision, even with the slight haze in the distance.  It seems to add to the almost ethereal state of the place in my memory, these several months since the hike.

The images of the broader landscape do not show much color in the grasses that cover the island, but taking a closer look, we can see that there is quite a bit of green remaining in the middle of August.

The hiker has now passed me in her trek up toward the peak.  She told me that she didn’t live too far away and that she hiked the trail several times a month.  How wonderful for her, and for the island as well, to have such a dedicated and frequent visitor.

A sun drenched trail on a summer morning….

The below photo shows Stansbury Island (peninsula?) to the west.  When the lake’s water level is as low as it has been in recent years, one can literally walk to the island on the exposed lake-bed.  I went exploring there several years ago and did not find it as compelling as my trips to Antelope Island.  There have been more mining and other commercial endeavors on Stansbury and only the far west side accommodates public visitation.

Looking north and east in the below photo, we can see the lighter gray of the lake-bed between the darker earth and the evident blue of the water…

….and south and east in the below image, down toward Salt Lake City with the Wasatch Mountains in the distance…and the layered and fractured rock in the foreground.

I had seen photos of the lone tree when I searched the internet for other images from the island.  The ones from winter-time with the stark white of the snow-covered ground were most compelling.

One last segment to follow….


Toward Frary Peak on Antelope Island – Part First

My very first trip to Antelope Island State Park was in February of 2012.  If you’re curious, you can click on this link to be taken back to the post I published after that visit.  And now my very most recent trip, partially documented in the following images, is from seven and one half years later, August of 2019.

Looking northeast-ish….

As I noted in the earlier posts about the sunrise on Antelope Island, it was my intention to get to the trailhead of the path that leads to Frary Peak at sunrise…but I was somehow delayed by the splendor of said sunrise reflecting off of the lake, etc., and didn’t get there until about an hour and a half later.

Turning your head a bit to the right from the above image…with the Wasatch Mountains in the background….

The images that follow are a chronological accounting of my hike up to the higher reaches on the island, close to 6,600 feet in elevation.  The trail is 3.5 miles in length and has an elevation gain of about 2,050 feet…which places the trailhead at right around 4,550 feet above sea level.

And now looking further southeast…back down toward Salt Lake City….

And I guess we could say we’re looking pretty much due south now in the below photo.

I’m drawn to the earth colors, the undulating hills, minor canyons or drainages, the small and larger crags, and the space that is open, yet bordered by the near water and the far mountains…I find it all compelling in a visceral sort of way.

All of this curved area in the below photo is referred to as “White Rock Bay,” which you can see here in an image from February 2014, with a much different perspective, as viewed from the north.

If I’m not mistaken, that’s Fremont Island off to the north…just left of center in the below photo…across the water.

Blue-green-gray sage in the foreground has an alluring scent, kind of resinous…and strong enough to linger on my fingertips for hours after rubbing/crushing the leaves between them…a small take-home treasure.

I didn’t see any antelope, but there were multiple strings of American Bison slowly trailing down the far/western side of the island.

A person approaches, below….

More to follow….


forest dreams in black and white

sometimes my daydreams are really thoughts about the things of which i would be dreaming, the words that describe what i would see or have seen, words i would use to tell you of the things i remember or wish to see again, so it might be appropriate to share those things in the black and white of words on paper, things which might be able to be described on the whole or in their collected parts, yet they are things which are beyond mere words when contemplated in the mixture of their richest essence, or in my experience, here

Dog Lake surround in B&W


Wasatch Mountain Wildflowers

Images of this nature used to be the normal fare for my spring and summer weekend hiking when I lived in Salt Lake City a few years ago…they were common enough punctuation marks in the trip narratives…highlights of color in the mountain landscapes…

…and now they are very occasional and intentional shared treasures of uncommon forays back into that used-to-be.

I don’t know the names of all of them, but when I do, I will share them, as I will here, above, with Queen Anne’s Lace, or Cow Parsnip…

…and the predominant flowers in the above image being Horsemint…a name shared with me by a fellow hiker after a chance encounter and then a follow-on comment on a post in those years ago.

Western Coneflowers above, something that I have also seen in the higher desert meadows of the Coconino National Forest just south of Flagstaff, Arizona.

The above resembles a type of gentian I have seen before, but I’m not sure how it is properly named.

A perfect Monday morning horizon above….

A trial for the newer camera…not entirely crispy, but still very clearly capturing dew drops on petals and leaves.

A richness of color for the eyes and morning crispness for the skin…and the mountain aroma of wet grasses and fragrant flowers….

I’m not sure about these, but there were tons of them on a western-facing slope as the sun was just over the mountains on the eastern side of the meadow….

Closer above and below….

And this one might be my favorite of the entire day…dew drops on Bluebells and leaves…I can still feel being there, making this particular photo, with anticipation and hope at what I would see on the computer when I brought the image home.

Life is full in that mountain environment, a feast for the senses at every turn.

And as I’ve shared previously, the Colorado Columbine, below, is my favorite flower, ever.

These were a first for me, the little purple Dr. Seuss flowers below….

And a fitting end for the post, I believe: a carpet of wildflowers with a Wasatch Mountain backdrop….

All images were made on 8-12-2019 during my very first hike from Brighton up to and from Lake Catherine.


Antelope Island at Sunrise – Part Second

…continued.

There was simply too much to see, too many sights that demanded attention, contemplation, worship…and photographs.

My kids who still live in Salt Lake City had told me about the record snowfall for the past winter and spring; I had also read about it on one of the social media sites from the area that I follow.

I guess I expected that some of the earlier season’s snowmelt would have made it to The Great Salt Lake and would have raised the water level a bit…would have raised it “any” amount, actually.

Western Spotted Orb Weaver spider on Antelope Island

There was water, of course, mostly north of the causeway from my vantage point, enough to provide those morning reflections that are inspiring in and of themselves…

…and enough, too, to afford the many waterfowl a place to forage, play, rest, and provide still other morning reflections that cause occasional human observers to stop along their various ways to attend, contemplate, worship…and photograph.

Also striking were the morning’s colors…the peachy orangish pink of the waking sky, shining of themselves above, and in the myriad reflections below…

…the black, dark purple, blue and gray of the lake’s living water…

…and the sage, green, rust, and straw colors of the waterside vegetation.

Cast all of those, too, among the brightening gold and greens of the covered hillsides and coves…

…the yellow faces and bonnets of the solitary individuals and masses of sunflowers…

…and finally the rich blacks and browns of the wandering bison.

It was a feast for my desert dwelling eyes.


Antelope Island at Sunrise – Part First

It has been a favorite pastime of mine for the past nine or so years to hike and to explore the mountains and canyons or desert plains and hills in my surround…

…or in the case of the last five years, in addition to the deserts, etc., the forests, mountains, and mesas that are within a few hours’ drive of where I live.

When I have had good or better fortune, I have been able to go back to those preferred mountains and islands of my not so distant past…

…those beloved places up north, and hike and explore and simply exist again in the environment or locale that remains in my core as “home.”

At some point in the early part of those few years that I lived up north, it became preferable to start the specific adventure, to be at the designated trailhead, before sunrise.

There were fewer cars in the parking lots, fewer pairs of boots on the trails heading into the mountains…

…and a greater chance of capturing the essence of an undisturbed morning’s peace when starting at such an hour.

In application to my southern journeys, it became prudent to start this early, so as to avoid the greater heat of the day by completing the trek and returning to my truck before noon.

That said, I had determined to arrive at the trailhead to Frary Peak on Antelope Island before the sun rose and started warming the northern Utah August day.

Well…I made it to the Antelope Island State Park entrance before sunrise…

…but was then waylaid by the views north and south and east and west while driving on the causeway to the island, so I didn’t make it to the trailhead until nearly an hour after sunrise.

To be…


Bells Canyon…like a memory

From the archives…June 15, 2017…heading toward the falls….


Twin Peaks from Dimple Dell Trail

It’s a sad song, but it struck me the other day that I have now been back in Arizona for longer than I had lived in Utah….and this little gem of a photo has been sitting in my “drafts” folder for over five years.  This particular day in March of 2013 found me walking the neighborhood trail called, “Dimple Dell,” and gazing eastward at the beautiful mass of rock and earth known generally as the Wasatch Mountains and specifically as Broads Fork Twin Peaks (only the western peak is visible; it’s the one on the right).  I had posted other images from the hike…maybe even some that looked very similar to this one…which probably explains why it was sitting in the “drafts” folder for so long.

Anyway, they are always bittersweet and tender moments when I look back and reflect upon what used to be in my backyard…at what was just a few minutes’ driving time from the house.  And there it is….

Twin Peaks from Dimple Dell Trail


Myrtle Spurge…and moments of a day….

It is almost as if I had been a child again, out exploring unknown and unsanctioned regions, far from home and the general safety that accompanies being in a place so named, a place where there were expectations and things that could be anticipated, good or not.  I was out in an area that had at least an essence of wildness and things not seen before, things not encountered previously other than in imagination or wonder, in an area that was not touched by expectations or any anticipation other than the ones that compelled me to be there to begin with.  Memories of my childhood situated me along slow-moving streams where the water was clear enough to see crawdads sitting motionless and tucked up under various shades of brown and gray rocks on the bottom, where my arms would be unknowingly scraped and sliced with moving among the tall reeds and brush that I had to penetrate to make it down to the stream, standing along the inside of a bay where I imagined that I could see dolphins’ and sharks’ fins cutting through the smooth or choppy water while military jets soared overhead, and where my presence in that other world was a welcome escape from the one where things were known and anticipated.  I find images in my mind, too, of old country roads with black and red raspberry bushes growing in hedge-form on the other sides of ditches that separated grassy fields of Dandelions and Queen Anne’s Lace growing in wild profusion…a road leading to a ruined castle, or another one or two that carried me to a sportsplatz and a logger’s camp in the deep pine forest…roads and pathways that led to places crammed full of a child’s joy in being out and away.

Myrtle Spurge 1

I had thought of those things then and now as I recount the day that I noticed the bright groundcover on a berm that we had to cross to make our way down to the lake…two hundred yards or more between where we parked and where we were intent on going.  The tightness of the leaves and the tiny cups of bright green, the inhospitable looking soil where they seemed to thrive, and the image of the lake and the snow-capped mountains beyond…all things noted and tucked away…stored now with what must be emotions or sensations of peace, contentment, and real happiness…a word that I don’t often use because the gap between perception and experience has been so wide.  But that’s where those memories are now, the lake and the mountains and the myrtle spurge and the company of my son…they are enveloped in a spot of truly happy serenity back there in the memory files somewhere.

Myrtle Spurge 2


Millcreek Stream in October….

I had visited the canyon probably multiple dozens of times during the three-plus years that I lived in the Salt Lake valley, but this was the first time I actually hiked/walked on this particular trail.  It’s more of a nature walk…or even just a pathway going from one picnic area to another…in the forest, alongside a stream, in the mountains, alone, with an occasional car to be heard coming or going up or down the canyon road…no crowds, no yelling teenagers or smaller people, just the sound of the stream, the chilled air, and the smell of a wet forest floor caught riding the occasional breeze to make me feel that I was where I belonged.