Posts tagged “Wildflowers

a morning’s grace

I have wanted to stop for years…

…at least a dozen of them…

…the years…

…and finally did…

…after passing the fields countless times…

…I couldn’t resist…

…heading north again…

…across from Sunset Point…

…just before “Sunrise….”


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just because….

Wildflowers of Bear Trap Gulch


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wildflower morning

wildflower morning


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flashback to summer

Wasatch Mountain Wildflowers on Great Western Trail


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Bowman Fork Wildflowers

Bowman Fork Wildflowers with Grandeur Peak and Millcreek Ridge


wildflowers, clouds, and mountains

This is the view facing east…up into Big Cottonwood Canyon, from Baker’s Pass, which is at the base of Gobbler’s Knob, above Mill A Flat, and positioned in front of Mount Raymond, on the east side…as one is preparing to turn to the left and head down into Bowman Fork…which leads to Millcreek Canyon…just east of Salt Lake City proper.  Wildflowers and clouds are hard to resist when presented with a Wasatch Mountain backdrop…..

wildflowers clouds and mountains


mountainside flower garden

On top of the world, so to speak, is where I found this natural garden…that is the crest or ridge-line along the top of a chain of mountains…and the flowers grow in profusion on the east-facing down-slope.  If you’d like to know where this is, exactly, go back to the map that I posted recently, find the yellow and pink pins toward the top of the map, follow the arcing white ridge down and to the left of the yellow pin until you come to the next pink pin….these flowers are literally right above that pink pin on the white ridge…or just down the other side, precisely.

Mountainside flower garden


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it was Spring….

Wasatch mountains over wildflowers


Dwarf Waterleaf in Millcreek Canyon

As I was going through my back-log of blog posts this morning, I came across John M. Smith’s post, Bluebells and Beech, and remembered that I was going to do a similar post on some Utah wildflowers that I had noticed after viewing Andy Hooker’s post, Bluebells 2013.

Dwarf Waterleaf along Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon, Utah

My older son and I were on the way to one of our Sunday morning hiking destinations, walking the Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon, just east of Salt Lake City proper.  While I have walked this trail more than a dozen times over the past few years, I have never noticed the profusion of a single type of wildflower like I did on this particular morning….and it was too good to resist…taking a break in the early part of the hike to kneel in the wild grass and flowers for a few minutes to take a few (?) pictures…..

Blanket of Dwarf Waterleaf, Millcreek Canyon, Utah

USWildflowers.com identifies these little beauties as being Dwarf Waterleaf, Bullhead Waterleaf…or Cat’s Breeches…with the scientific name of Hydrophyllum capitatum, for those of you interested in such things.  I’m sorry I can’t name the trees…but here you are anyway with the blanket of spring wildflowers on a beautiful Spring morning….as my son and I were heading to our own version of Sunday services……

Dwarf Waterleaf close-up, Millcreek Canyon, Utah


Cow Parsnip

If it were to be growing in someone’s yard or along a fence somewhere, it might be referred to as a weed, but when we find it out in the wilds of the canyons and mountains, it is easy to see that it is anything but a weed…it is a beautiful wildflower, properly referred to as an herb.  It can reach over six feet in height and can grow in environments from sea level to around 9,000 feet in elevation.  If I tell you anything else about it, I’m sure it will sound like I’ve been reading Wikipedia…which I have….  It might not be a truly scholarly resource, but it is a readily available one…and thank you, too, Google….  🙂


One hike…and 23 wildflowers…part three

This is the last segment of wildflower photos from my hike from Millcreek Canyon, over the Lambs Canyon Pass, and down to Lambs Canyon.  To see the first two posts, click here and here…and, as always, thank you for visiting.


One hike…and 23 wildflowers…part two

…picking-up where we left-off in “One hike…and 23 wildflowers…part one“….

To be continued one more time….


One hike…and 23 wildflowers…part one

This was a longish hike, to Lambs Canyon Pass and beyond, part of which I had made before…once in the middle of January or February when I had turned around 30 yards shy of the pass, as the snow was over my knees and making the hike more work than fun.  At any rate, I set out this past Sunday to accomplish the entire trail, two miles along the Pipeline Trail in Millcreek Canyon to the trailhead just beyond Elbow Fork, two miles up to the pass, and then another two miles down to the road in Lambs Canyon…and then turned around and did it all in reverse order to make it home again.  As I began the hike, I noticed different flowers that appeared in single bunches or individual plants and then didn’t notice any others of their kind anywhere along the trail…so I started taking pictures of what I found…and as the hours and miles ticked by, I thought about all of the different flowers that I had encountered and couldn’t help but smile and think of Allen from New Hampshire Garden Solutions and his comments on earlier posts, something to the effect of “Wow…that looks like a good place to find a bunch of wildflowers.”  If you aren’t familiar with Allen’s blog, I highly recommend a visit…it’s chock-full of beautiful photographs of wildflowers and plants that he encounters during his own forays into the wild, as well as those from his garden and other New Hampshire locations that he frequents…each post of photographs also includes an interesting narrative about each plant.  So here you are, Allen…part one of three.  The photos aren’t of the best quality, as the morning sun was quite bright and caused a bit of over-exposure on some of them, but I think they are still a fair representation of the natural beauty of the flowers as they adorned the trail to Lambs Canyon.

to be continued….


Wasatch Mountain Wildflowers

These photos were taken on the trails to and from White Pine and Red Pine Lakes.  Both lakes are situated in canyon areas that extend south of Little Cottonwood Canyon in the Wasatch Mountain Front.